Can A Video Game Help Your Teenagers Understand HIV Risks?

Lynn E. Fiellin, M.D. Associate Professor of Medicine Director, play2PREVENT Lab Yale University School of Medicine New Haven, CT 06510MedicalResearch.com Interview with
Lynn E. Fiellin, M.D.
Associate Professor of Medicine
Director, play2PREVENT Lab
Yale University School of Medicine
New Haven, CT 06510

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Fiellin: The current findings are part of a larger study evaluating an interactive evidence-based video game, PlayForward: Elm City Stories, developed on the iPad and targeting risk reduction and HIV prevention in 333 young teens (ages 11-14). The larger study is examining a range of outcomes including knowledge, intentions, self-efficacy and actual behaviors and we are collecting at baseline, 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. We are examining these outcomes in our experimental group compared with a control group playing a set of off-the-shelf games on the iPad. The current findings of the 196 teens who have completed the 6 weeks of gameplay and for whom we have baseline and 3 month data, reveal that, while the two groups had no differences in their baseline HIV risk knowledge, the PlayForward group had statistically significant gains in knowledge at 6 weeks (p<0.0001), sustained at 3 months (p<0.01). In addition, examining the association between exposure to the game and performance on the standardized assessments revealed that the number of game levels completed (a measure of exposure to the intervention) was positively correlated with knowledge gains measured at 3 months (r=0.42; p<0.001).

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What Is Risk of Cancer In Women Who Have Morcellation Hysterectomy?

Jason D. Wright, M.D. Levine Family Assistant Professor of Women's Health Florence Irving Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology Division of Gynecologic Oncology Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons 161 Fort Washington Ave, 8th Floor New York, New York 10032MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Jason D. Wright, M.D.
Levine Family Assistant Professor of Women’s Health
Florence Irving Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Division of Gynecologic Oncology
Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons
161 Fort Washington Ave, New York, New York 10032

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Wright: This study is one of the first large scale studies to examine the risk of cancer specifically in women who underwent hysterectomy with electric power morcellation. Among 32,000 women treated at over 500 hospitals across the US we noted cancer in 27 per 10,000 women.
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Acetaminophen (Paracetamol) No Better than Than Placebo For Back Pain

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
R Chris Williams PhD
Honorary Fellow, Musculoskeletal Division
The George Institute for Global Health
Sydney NSW 2000 Australia

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Williams: We found that in addition to advice and reassurance, ‘regular’ or ‘as needed’ paracetamol did not improve recovery time for people with low back pain, compared to placebo. We also found the pain intensity and a range of other relevant measures, such as patient’s physical function was not different between the treatment groups.

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Life Expectancy Limited By Multiple Chronic Health Conditions

Eva DuGoff, PhD, MPP Graduate Student Department of Health Policy and Management Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public HealthMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Eva DuGoff, PhD, MPP
Graduate Student
Department of Health Policy and Management
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

 

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. DuGoff: In this study we investigate average life expectancy in older adults living with one to 10 or more different chronic conditions. Our main finding is that life expectancy decreases with each additional chronic condition.
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Genes Linked To Breast Cancer In East Asian Women Identified

Qiuyin Cai, M.D., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Medicine Vanderbilt University

Dr. Qiuyin Cai, M.D., Ph.D. Courtesy: Vanderbilt University

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Qiuyin Cai, M.D., Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Medicine
Vanderbilt University

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Cai: We conducted a genome-wide association study in East Asians to search for additional genetic changes that are linked to breast cancer development. The study was conducted as part of the Asia Breast Cancer Consortium, which includes 22,780 women with breast cancer and 24,181 control subjects. We found DNA sequence changes in two genes, PRC1 and ZC3H11A, and a change near the ARRDC3 gene were associated with breast cancer risk. These results were also replicated in a large consortium, including 16,003 breast cancer cases and 41,335 control subjects of European ancestry.
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Central Venous Catheters Raise Infection Risk in Cancer Patients

Allison Lipitz-Snyderman, PhD Assistant Attending Outcomes Research Scientist Center for Health Policy and Outcomes Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center New York, NY  10065MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Allison Lipitz-Snyderman, PhD
Assistant Attending Outcomes Research Scientist
Center for Health Policy and Outcomes
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center New York, NY  10065

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Lipitz-Snyderman: Long-term central venous catheters are used to administer intravenous fluids and treatments such as chemotherapy.  These catheters can also be a source of bloodstream infections which can be harmful to cancer patients.  However, this risk is not well understood.  In our study, we found that the use of these catheters was associated with an increased risk of infections for patients with cancer.  We used a population-based dataset, SEER-Medicare, to study this issue in older adult cancer patients.  This dataset allowed us to study patients treated in different institutions and follow them over time.
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Postpartum Depression Risk Reduced By Epidural Analgesia

Dr. Dong-Xin Wang, MD, PhD Department of Anesthesiology and Surgical Intensive Care Peking University First Hospital Beijing 100034, ChinaMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Dong-Xin Wang, MD, PhD
Department of Anesthesiology and Surgical Intensive Care
Peking University First Hospital
Beijing 100034, China

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Answer: We found that use of epidural analgesia during labor is associated with decreased risk of postpartum depression.
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Moral Judgment Impairment Can Be Seen With Both Dementia and Stroke

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Agustin Ibanez, PhD
Laboratory of Experimental Psychology and Neuroscience
Institute of Cognitive Neurology and the National Scientific
and Technical Research Council and

Sandra Baez, MS;
Institute of Cognitive
Neurology and Institute of Neuroscience,
Favaloro University, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Answer: Both patients with the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and patients with frontal strokes presented moral judgment abnormalities. Their deficits were related to impairments in the integration of intentions and outcomes. Specifically, both patient groups judged moral scenarios by focusing on the actions’ outcomes instead of the protagonists’ intentions.
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Gene Associated with Benign Breast Tumors Discovered

MedicalResearch.com Interview with
Dr Lim Weng Khong
Research Fellow, National Cancer Centre Singapore.

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr Lim Weng Khong: This study uncovered the genetic cause fibroadenomas, which are very common benign breast tumours in women. The team from National Cancer Centre Singapore, Singapore General Hospital and Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School identified a critical gene called MED12 that has frequent durations in a remarkable 60 per cent of fibroadenomas studied. Their findings have been published in the top-ranked journal Nature Genetics.
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Psoriasis May Increase Risk of Atherosclerosis

Reza Robati, MD Associate Professor of Dermatology Deputy editor, Iranian Journal of Dermatology Skin Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences Tehran, IranMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Reza Robati, MD
Associate Professor of Dermatology
Deputy editor, Iranian Journal of Dermatology
Skin Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences
Tehran, Iran

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Robati: In our study, increased levels of serum leptin and resistin and increased intima-media wall thickness of common carotid artery were observed in 60 psoriasis patients in comparison with 60 healthy controls. Moreover, we found positive correlation between these variables in psoriasis patients.
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