Breast Cancer Growth: Role of Hormones and Aromatase Inhibitors

Rajkumar Lakshmanaswamy, PhD Research Director of the Center of Excellence in Cancer Research The Paul L. Foster School of Medicine Texas Tech University Health Sciences CenterMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Rajkumar Lakshmanaswamy, PhD
Research Director of the Center of Excellence in Cancer Research
The Paul L. Foster School of Medicine
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center


Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Lakshmanaswamy: Our study supports a growing body of research suggesting a safe and effective role for natural steroid hormones in treating postmenopausal breast cancer, with fewer detrimental side effects and an improved health profile than with standard anti-hormone therapies. Using a mouse model mimicking human breast cancer after menopause, we found that treatment with estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone was associated with greater physical activity, improved cognition, and better cardiovascular and bone health, which demonstrates the potential significance of hormone treatment in postmenopausal women.

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Heart Transplant Waiting List: Women Dying Faster Than Men

Dr. Eileen Hsich MD Director of the Women’s Heart Failure Clinic Associate Medical Director for the Heart Transplant Program Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OhioMedicalResearch.com Interview Invitation 
Dr. Eileen Hsich MD
Director of the Women’s Heart Failure Clinic
Associate Medical Director for the Heart Transplant Program
Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio


Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Hsich: Women are dying on the heart transplant waiting list at a faster rate than men for almost a decade (see Figure 1) and few studies have even addressed this problem. The occurrence is largely driven by gender differences in survival at the most urgent status (UNOS Status 1A) but the cause remains unclear. Although data is limited our findings raise concern that women are not successfully bridged to transplantation while they remain at high status and are inactivated due to worsening condition.

Figure 1. Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients: Mortality on Waiting List For Heart Transplantation

Heart waiting list by gender 2000-2009

 

Figure derived from table in Scientific registry of transplant recipients: Heart waiting list by gender 2000-2009. Available at:
Http://srtr.Transplant.Hrsa.Gov/annual_reports/2010/1103_can-gender_hr.Htm
accessed january 9, 2014.

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Widowhood May Delay Dementia

Dr. Bryan K. Woodruff Assistant Professor of Neurology Mayo Clinic, ArizonaMedicalResearch.com Interview Invitation
Dr. Bryan K. Woodruff
Assistant Professor of Neurology
Mayo Clinic, Arizona

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Woodruff: There is evidence in the medical literature supporting a negative impact of losing a spouse for health conditions such as cancer or cardiovascular disease, but this has not been evaluated in terms of the impact of widowhood on the development of dementia.  We used the National Alzheimer’s Disease Coordinating Center (NACC) database, which pools data gathered by multiple federally-funded Alzheimer’s disease research centers to try to answer this question.  Specifically, we looked at the age at which individuals ultimately developed dementia in both individuals who lost their spouse and in those who remained married over the course of the study.  Surprisingly, the data we analyzed did not support a negative impact of losing a spouse in individuals who had no cognitive difficulties when they entered the study, and we saw a paradoxical effect of widowhood in those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).
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Sports Drinks Linked To Weight Gain in Adolescents

Alison E. Field, ScD Professor of Pediatrics Boston Children's Hospital Division of Adolescent Medicine Boston, MA  02115MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Alison E. Field, ScD
Professor of Pediatrics
Boston Children’s Hospital
Division of Adolescent Medicine
Boston, MA  02115

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Answer: We found that intake of regular soda is decreasing, whereas, sports drink consumption is increasing. More importantly, we found that intake of sports drinks predicted greater weight gain among adolescent boys and girls.
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Hot Flashes? Nightsweats? It May Be Your Caffeine….

Stephanie Faubion, M.D Director of the Women’s Health Clinic Mayo Clinic in RochesterMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Stephanie Faubion, M.D
Director of the Women’s Health Clinic
Mayo Clinic in Rochester

 

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Faubion: In this study that included over 1800 women, we found that caffeine intake was associated with more bothersome hot flashes and night sweats in postmenopausal women.
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Can A Video Game Help Your Teenagers Understand HIV Risks?

Lynn E. Fiellin, M.D. Associate Professor of Medicine Director, play2PREVENT Lab Yale University School of Medicine New Haven, CT 06510MedicalResearch.com Interview with
Lynn E. Fiellin, M.D.
Associate Professor of Medicine
Director, play2PREVENT Lab
Yale University School of Medicine
New Haven, CT 06510

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Fiellin: The current findings are part of a larger study evaluating an interactive evidence-based video game, PlayForward: Elm City Stories, developed on the iPad and targeting risk reduction and HIV prevention in 333 young teens (ages 11-14). The larger study is examining a range of outcomes including knowledge, intentions, self-efficacy and actual behaviors and we are collecting at baseline, 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. We are examining these outcomes in our experimental group compared with a control group playing a set of off-the-shelf games on the iPad. The current findings of the 196 teens who have completed the 6 weeks of gameplay and for whom we have baseline and 3 month data, reveal that, while the two groups had no differences in their baseline HIV risk knowledge, the PlayForward group had statistically significant gains in knowledge at 6 weeks (p<0.0001), sustained at 3 months (p<0.01). In addition, examining the association between exposure to the game and performance on the standardized assessments revealed that the number of game levels completed (a measure of exposure to the intervention) was positively correlated with knowledge gains measured at 3 months (r=0.42; p<0.001).

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What Is Risk of Cancer In Women Who Have Morcellation Hysterectomy?

Jason D. Wright, M.D. Levine Family Assistant Professor of Women's Health Florence Irving Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology Division of Gynecologic Oncology Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons 161 Fort Washington Ave, 8th Floor New York, New York 10032MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Jason D. Wright, M.D.
Levine Family Assistant Professor of Women’s Health
Florence Irving Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Division of Gynecologic Oncology
Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons
161 Fort Washington Ave, New York, New York 10032

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Wright: This study is one of the first large scale studies to examine the risk of cancer specifically in women who underwent hysterectomy with electric power morcellation. Among 32,000 women treated at over 500 hospitals across the US we noted cancer in 27 per 10,000 women.
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Acetaminophen (Paracetamol) No Better than Than Placebo For Back Pain

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
R Chris Williams PhD
Honorary Fellow, Musculoskeletal Division
The George Institute for Global Health
Sydney NSW 2000 Australia

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Williams: We found that in addition to advice and reassurance, ‘regular’ or ‘as needed’ paracetamol did not improve recovery time for people with low back pain, compared to placebo. We also found the pain intensity and a range of other relevant measures, such as patient’s physical function was not different between the treatment groups.

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Life Expectancy Limited By Multiple Chronic Health Conditions

Eva DuGoff, PhD, MPP Graduate Student Department of Health Policy and Management Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public HealthMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Eva DuGoff, PhD, MPP
Graduate Student
Department of Health Policy and Management
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

 

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. DuGoff: In this study we investigate average life expectancy in older adults living with one to 10 or more different chronic conditions. Our main finding is that life expectancy decreases with each additional chronic condition.
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Genes Linked To Breast Cancer In East Asian Women Identified

Qiuyin Cai, M.D., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Medicine Vanderbilt University

Dr. Qiuyin Cai, M.D., Ph.D. Courtesy: Vanderbilt University

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Qiuyin Cai, M.D., Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Medicine
Vanderbilt University

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Cai: We conducted a genome-wide association study in East Asians to search for additional genetic changes that are linked to breast cancer development. The study was conducted as part of the Asia Breast Cancer Consortium, which includes 22,780 women with breast cancer and 24,181 control subjects. We found DNA sequence changes in two genes, PRC1 and ZC3H11A, and a change near the ARRDC3 gene were associated with breast cancer risk. These results were also replicated in a large consortium, including 16,003 breast cancer cases and 41,335 control subjects of European ancestry.
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