psychedelics

Psychedelics: How You Respond May Depend on Your Genes

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Bryan Roth, MD, PhD Michael Hooker Distinguished Professor Pharmacology Director, NIMH Psychoactive Drug Screening Program Eshelman School of Pharmacy

Dr. Roth

Bryan Roth, MD, PhD
Michael Hooker Distinguished Professor
Pharmacology Director, NIMH Psychoactive Drug Screening Program
Eshelman School of Pharmacy

Gavin Schmitz

Gavin P. Schmitz
Department of Pharmacology

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine
Chapel Hill, North Carolina

 

Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina

MedicalResearch.com:  What is the background for this study?  What are the main findings? 

Response: There is undoubtably a lot of enthusiasm for psychedelics as therapeutic tools right now both in research and more broadly; however, there are still so many questions that need to be answered. It has been established that SNPs are clinically relevant when considering how patients may respond to various atypical antipsychotic drugs, so we wanted to see if they also could impact psychedelic assisted treatment strategies.

What we found is that genetics do matter; namely, our results indicate that patients with different genes will react differently to psychedelics.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: We think the primary message of our report is that not everyone will respond the same to psychedelics and psychedelic-assisted treatments. Everyone is built a little bit differently and those differences do matter, especially when it comes to your health.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: We hope our results will inform future clinical trials and push physicians to consider the genetics of a patient’s serotonin receptors as they analyze responses to psychedelic-assisted treatment.

No disclosures

Citation:

5‑HT2A SNPs Alter the Pharmacological Signaling of Potentially Therapeutic Psychedelics Gavin P. Schmitz, Manish K. Jain, Samuel T. Slocum, and Bryan L. Roth* ACS Chemical Neuroscience https://doi.org/10.1021/acschemneuro.1c00815
https://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/acschemneuro.1c00815

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Jul 30, 2022 @ 12:54 am

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