Marcella Aquino, M.D. Hasbro Children's Hospital Department of Pediatrics Division of Allergy & Immunology Associate Professor of Pediatrics

Poor Sleep Quality in Asthmatic Children With Atopic Dermatitis

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Marcella Aquino, M.D. Hasbro Children's Hospital Department of Pediatrics Division of Allergy & Immunology Associate Professor of Pediatrics

Dr. Aquino

Marcella Aquino, M.D.
Hasbro Children’s Hospital
Department of Pediatrics
Division of Allergy & Immunology
Associate Professor of Pediatrics

 

Daphne Koinis-Mitchell PhD                                    Professor (Research) in the Departments of Psychiatry and                                    Human Behavior and Pediatrics

Dr. Koinis-Mitchell

Daphne Koinis-Mitchell PhD
Professor (Research) in the Departments of Psychiatry and
Human Behavior and Pediatrics

Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
Providence, Rhode Island 02903

 


MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Urban minority children with asthma are at increased risk for sleep loss and poorer sleep quality secondary to socio-contextual stressors (poverty, stressors of urban living) and the underlying challenges related to following possibly complex asthma treatment regimens. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is very frequently seen in children with asthma and increases the risk for poor quality sleep, for example difficulty falling asleep, awakenings during the night, difficulty awakening in the morning, and/or daytime sleepiness. 

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: Data from 206 children with asthma only and 35 children with asthma plus Atopic dermatitis were reviewed. Asthma control was assessed via handheld FEV1, asthma control test and asthma questionnaire while objective sleep quality was assessed via actigraphy. In terms of asthma control, there was no difference in FEV1, poorly or well controlled ACT score or parental reported asthma symptoms in patients with asthma alone versus asthma plus AD; however, the children that had the greater number of nighttime awakenings had a lower mean FEV1 (rho=-.39, p=.03). Please note:  The number of nighttime awakenings (F=5.82, p=.003) were poorest in children who had asthma plus Atopic dermatitis.

So in conclusion, in urban minority children with asthma plus Atopic dermatitis, sleep outcomes were poorer than their asthma alone counterparts and this impacted mean FEV1 values.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: The dual diagnosis of asthma plus atopic dermatitis affects the quality of sleep in urban children and these effects are possibly additive to other social and environmental stressors to impact health, learning and behavior.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work? 

Response: We plan to prospectively study a cohort of children with atopic dermatitis and evaluate sleep, atopic dermatitis control and barriers to implantation of standard AD care. 

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: The data was extracted from the Nocturnal Asthma and Performance in School (NICHD # R01HD057220, PI Koinis Mitchell), a study of asthma and sleep in urban, ethnically diverse children (ages 7-9).

Citation:

AAAAI 2020 Abstract

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Mar 10, 2020 @ 5:48 pm

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