African Americans Do Worse After Joint Replacements, But Only In Disadvantaged Neighborhoods

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Susan M. Goodman, MD Director of the Integrative Rheumatology and Orthopedics Center of Excellence Hospital for Special Surgery

Dr. Goodman

Susan M. Goodman, MD
Director of the Integrative Rheumatology and Orthopedics Center of Excellence
Hospital for Special Surgery 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We have previously reported that African Americans who have poorer health outcomes, may be disproportionately impacted by community factors. For African Americans undergoing knee replacement, no difference in pain and function was seen compared to whites in communities with little poverty, while in poor communities, African Americans had poorer outcomes. We wondered if this was generally true or if this only applied to knee replacements.

We found similar results; African Americans in richer neighborhoods have comparable outcomes to whites, but as poverty increases- in this study measured as percent with Medicaid coverage- outcomes worsen in a step wise fashion.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Response: This study demonstrates that interactions can be complicated- as we look at outcomes generally, it appears that African Americans do worse after arthroplasty than whites, but when we expand our analysis to include the interactions with community factors, it is only in the disadvantaged communities where African Americans have poorer outcomes.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: This study highlights the significance of socioeconomic factors in health outcomes, and the importance of analyzing contextual factors that may influence results.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation: Abstract presented at the American College of Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals annual meeting on November 5 2017

Social Factors and Racial Disparities in Total Hip Arthroplasty Outcomes

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

 

 

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