Asthma Outcomes Worse in Low Income Groups

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Wanda Phipatanakul, MD, MS Associate Professor of Pediatrics Harvard Medical School Director, Asthma Clinical Research Center Boston Children's Hospital Asthma, Allergy and Immunology Boston, MA 02115

Dr. Phipatanakul

Wanda Phipatanakul, MD, MS
Associate Professor of Pediatrics
Harvard Medical School
Director, Asthma Clinical Research Center
Boston Children’s Hospital
Asthma, Allergy and Immunology
Boston, MA 02115

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Observational studies have limitations in their ability to examine disparities in asthma, as these studies have relied on self-reported measures of medication use, asthma diagnosis, severity, outcomes, and access to care.

Using data collected from a randomized controlled trial, we found that subjects with lower income had a significantly higher number of asthma treatment failures and asthma exacerbations, independent of race, BMI, education, perceived stress, baseline lung function, hospitalizations, inhaled corticosteroid adherence, inhaled corticosteroid dose, environmental allergen sensitization, and second-hand smoke exposure.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Asthma outcomes are worse in low income groups, regardless of race, BMI, perceived stress, inhaled corticosteroid dose or adherence, baseline asthma control, and second-hand smoke exposure. Suggesting that being low income has biological consequences in regards to asthma severity and control.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: In summary, we found that in the setting of a randomized clinical trial, lower household income is associated with poor asthma outcomes. The factors underlying lower income as a risk factor for worse asthma are unknown and warrant further research. Clinicians should be aware of the higher morbidity associated with low income for reasons independent of asthma severity, lung function, and access and compliance with controller therapy. Clinical researchers may want to ensure that randomization of trial participants, account for household income to adequately balance risk factors.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Income Is an Independent Risk Factor for Worse Asthma Outcomes
Cardet, Juan Carlos et al.
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology , Volume 137 , Issue 2 , AB9 Feb 2016
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0091674917307923

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2015.12.029

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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