Bisphenol A Linked To Oxidative Stress in Pregnancy

Vasantha Padmanabhan, MS, PhD Professor, Departments of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Molecular and Integrative Physiology, and Environmental Health Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Mi 48109MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Vasantha Padmanabhan, MS, PhD

Professor, Departments of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Molecular and Integrative Physiology, and Environmental Health Sciences
University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Mi 48109

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Controversy exists regarding the human health effects of bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine-disrupting industrial chemical, present in plastic products, baby bottles, food can liners, and wide array of paper products including cash receipts. BPA has been linked to adverse metabolic effects, including obesity, diabetes and cardiac disease.  This study examined if exposure to bisphenol A during pregnancy, at levels humans are exposed to, induces oxidative stress, a major contributor to the development of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. Findings from this multi species study show an association between higher maternal- and cord-blood BPA levels and 3-nitrotyrosine Y (NY), a marker of oxidative stress, in 24 pregnant women. Similar effect on oxidative stress was also found when human-comparable BPA doses were given to pregnant sheep and rats. Similarity of findings between BPA exposure and oxidative stress in the human association study and animals testing study raises concern about potential risk of BPA later in life.

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Response: The take-home message to clinicians or patients is that research findings point to potential risk from bisphenol A exposure during pregnancy to offspring health. Minimizing BPA exposure during pregnancy, in principle may safeguard both adults and babies from oxidant injury.

Medical Research: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Larger cohort studies need to be carried out to determine the long-term consequences of exposure to bisphenol A during pregnancy. Follow up studies in children are needed to see if they develop metabolic dysfunction later in life.

Citation:

Endocrinology. 2015 Jan 20:en20141863. [Epub ahead of print]

Impact of Gestational Bisphenol A on Oxidative Stress and Free Fatty Acids: Human Association and Interspecies Animal Testing Studies.

Veiga-Lopez A1, Pennathur S, Kannan K, Patisaul HB, Dolinoy DC, Zeng L, Padmanabhan V.

 

 

 

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