Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Acute Brain Lesions on MRI Can Predict Delayed Sequelae

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“Danger Carbon Monoxide” by SmartSign is licensed under CC BY 2.0Won Young Kim, MD PhD
Department of Emergency Medicine
Asan Medical Center
University of Ulsan College of Medicine
Seoul, Korea

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Neurological symptoms of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning can manifest not only immediately but also as late as 2 to 6 weeks after successful initial resuscitation as delayed neurological sequelae (DNS). To date, no reliable methods of assessing the probability of DNS after acute CO poisoning have been developed, which make it difficult to research the pathophysiology of DNS and targeting prevention.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: We found that the presence of acute brain lesions was significantly associated with the development of delayed neurological sequelae. 

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Physicians should be aware that acute CO poisoning can result in various acute brain lesions and that the presence of these lesions is associated with the development of delayed neurological sequelae. Diffusion-weighted imaging during the acute phase of CO poisoning may help identify patients at risk of developing these debilitating sequelae. 

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: Diffusion-weighted imaging can potentially indicate the subsequent development of DNS could give clinicians and researchers useful information for understanding the pathophysiology of DNS and targeting prevention. Therefore, preventive research including hyperbaric oxygen therapy can be performed more aggressively in high-risk patients with delayed neurological sequelae.

No disclosures

Citations: 

Jeon S, Sohn CH, Seo D, Oh BJ, Lim KS, Kang D, Kim WY. Acute Brain Lesions on Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Delayed Neurological Sequelae in Carbon Monoxide Poisoning. JAMA Neurol. Published online January 29, 2018. doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2017.4618 

 

 

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