Coffee Intake: Risk Factor for Higher Mortality in Men, Not Women

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Xuemei Sui, MD, MPH, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Exercise Science
Arnold School of Public Health
University of South Carolina
921 Assembly Street Room 226
Columbia, SC 29208

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Answer: Coffee intake was a risk factor with higher mortality in men, but not in women. Men who drank more than 28 cups of coffee weekly had a 21% higher risk of dying when comparing with their non-coffee-consuming peers. In addition, younger men (age<55 years) who drank more than 28 cups of coffee weekly had a 56% increase in mortality from all-cause and younger women had a greater than 2-fold higher risk of all-cause mortality than those who did not drink coffee.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Answer: MODERATION is key. Drinking 1-4 cups per day coffee seem safe and avoid heavy coffee consumption especially for people who are younger than 55 year.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Answer: Future research should examine other causes of death such as cancer and investigate the mechanism between coffee intake and health benefits or risks.

Citation:

Association of coffee consumption with all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality

Junxiu Liu, MD; Xuemei Sui, MD, PhD; Carl J. Lavie, MD; James R. Hebert, ScD; Conrad P. Earnest, PhD; Jiajia Zhang, PhD; and Steven N. Blair, PED

Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research n Mayo Clin Proc. 2013;nn(n):1-9