Could Keloids Suggest Increased Risk of Breast Cancer?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Lamont R. Jones, MD, MBA Vice Chair Department of Otolaryngology HNS Henry Ford Hospital Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Director Cleft and Craniofacial Clinic Otolaryngology Service Chief Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital

Dr. Jones

Lamont R. Jones, MD, MBA
Vice Chair
Department of Otolaryngology HNS
Henry Ford Hospital
Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Director Cleft and Craniofacial Clinic
Otolaryngology Service Chief
Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The objective of this study was to explore the potential link between keloid development and clinical outcomes of African American women with breast cancer.

MedicalResearch.com: Would you briefly explain what is meant by a keloid?

Response: A keloid is a benign fibrorproliferative tumor of the skin which is more common in African Americans which results from injury such as surgery, ear piercing, burns or infection.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: Keloid status of an individual may be indicative of a risk to be diagnosed with early-onset, late staged breast cancer. In addition, it was a distinguishing factor among African American women, which may point to a pathological/molecular pathway that predicates their unique cancer risk.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: The research results are preliminary. However, because keloids disproportionately affect African American patients, it may serve as a model to better understand how their tissue microenvironment. Moreover, insights into keloid formation may help to identify ancestry specific biomarkers that may be used as future therapeutic targets to treat cancers in African Americans.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work? 

Response: Larger prospective or case control studies may provide more information and better determine the potential correlation of keloid status and breast cancer outcomes. 

Citation:

https://www.henryford.com/news/2019/01/keloids-linked-to-early-onset-and-late-stage-breast-cancer

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