Elevated PSA Linked To Increase Risk of Urinary Symptoms in Men

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Stephen J. Freedland, MD Associate Director, Faculty Development Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute Co-Director, Cancer Genetics and Prevention Program Director, Center for Integrated Research in Cancer and Lifestyle Professor, Surgery Warschaw Robertson Law Families Chair in Prostate Cancer Cedars-Sinai, Los Angeles

Dr. Stephen Freedland

Stephen J. Freedland, MD
Associate Director, Faculty Development Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute
Co-Director, Cancer Genetics and Prevention Program
Director, Center for Integrated Research in Cancer and Lifestyle
Professor, Surgery
Warschaw Robertson Law Families Chair in Prostate Cancer
Cedars-Sinai, Los Angeles 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Freedland:   PSA is a marker of prostate pathology.  While often used to screen for prostate cancer, it is not prostate specific and can be elevated due to inflammation or enlarged prostate or other reasons.  Whether it predicts the development of urinary symptoms is not clear.  Among men with minimal to no urinary symptoms, we found that the higher the PSA, the greater the risk of future development of urinary symptoms.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Freedland: The readers should know that if a man has an elevated PSA and a negative prostate biopsy, the higher the PSA, the greater the risk of future urinary symptoms.  These are men who may need closer follow-up.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Freedland: The main question is “why”.  Why does higher PSA mean greater urinary symptoms risk.  Is it due to inflammation?  Something else?  If we know that, we can figure out some of the causes of urinary symptoms and help to prevent them.

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Dr. Freedland:  The overall risk of developing urinary symptoms is modest.  Thus, while these men may need closer follow-up, at this stage, treating these men with a 5-alpha reductase inhibitor or other drugs to prevent urinary symptoms is not warranted. 

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Abstract presented at the April 2016 AUA meeting:

Funding: This study was supported by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK).
MP35-12: PSA Predicts Development of Incident Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: Results from the REDUCE Study
Tom Feng*, Los Angeles, CA, Ross Simon, Tampa, FL, Lauren Howard, Durham, NC, Adriana Vidal, Los Angeles, CA, Daniel Moreira, Rochester, MN, Ramiro Castro-Santamaria, King of Prussia, PA, Gerald Andriole, St. Louis, MO, Claus Roehrborn, Dallas, TX, Stephen Freedland, Los Angeles, CA

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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