Fall Prevention Programs Can Reduce Injuries and Costs

Judy A. Stevens PhD National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta GA 30341MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Judy Stevens PhD
National Center for Injury Prevention and Control
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Stevens: Falls among people aged 65 and older are a serious, costly, and growing public health problem. As our population ages, falls will continue to increase unless we implement effective prevention strategies that are also cost-effective.

This study found that three evidence-based fall prevention programs, the Otago Exercise Program, Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance, and Stepping On, were not only practical and effective but also provided a positive return on investment (ROI) or net benefit.  An ROI of 150% means for each $1 spent on implementing the program, you can expect a net benefit of $1.50.

The analysis found that the cost of implementing each of these fall prevention programs was considerably less than the potential medical costs needed to care for someone injured from a fall. These research findings can help community organizations and policymakers identify and use programs that can both save lives and reduce costs.

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Stevens: The analysis found that the cost of implementing each of these fall prevention programs was considerably less than the potential medical costs needed to care for someone injured from a fall. These research findings can help community organizations and policymakers identify and use programs that can both save lives and reduce costs.

Medical Research: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Stevens: Research is needed to more fully explore the factors that contribute to both the costs and the benefits of fall prevention programs.  Examples would include costs associated with transportation and caregiving.  Benefits would include a reduction in fall injuries and improvements in participants’ quality of life.

Citation:

A cost–benefit analysis of three older adult fall prevention interventions

Vilma Carande-Kulis Judy A. Stevens, Curtis S. Florence Bonita L. Beattie Ileana Arias

Journal of Safety Research Available online 6 January 2015

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MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Dr. Judy Stevens PhD (2015). Fall Prevention Programs Can Reduce Injuries and Costs MedicalResearch.com

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