Hypothyroidism and Mild Cognitive Impairment Risk?

Ajay K Parsaik, MD, MS Department of Psychiatry and Behavior Sciences The University of Texas Medical School, Houston Department of Neurology and Mayo Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MinnesotaMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Ajay K Parsaik, MD, MS
Department of Psychiatry and Behavior Sciences
The University of Texas Medical School, Houston
Department of Neurology and Mayo Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Parsaik: Main findings of our study are that clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism is not associated with mild cognitive impairment in an elderly population after accounting for possible confounding factors and interactions.
MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected?

Dr. Parsaik:  Yes, these findings were unexpected as there is limited previous evidence supporting it.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Parsaik:

For patients – Clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism is not associated with mild cognitive impairment among elderly.

For clinicians-

Main message for clinician is that they should reassure the patients with hypothyroidism and sub clinical hypothyroidism that none of them are associated with mild cognitive impairment. While evaluating the patients with mild cognitive impairment for underlying etiologies, they should focus more on other causes.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Parsaik:   Our results should be validated in longitudinal cohort study.

Citation:

Parsaik AK, Singh B, Roberts RO, et al. Hypothyroidism and Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Elderly Persons: A Population-Based Study. JAMA Neurol. 2013;():. doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.5402.

No Comments

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.