Late Sleepers Don’t Have Higher BMI

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Kelly Glazer Baron, PhD, MPH, C. B.S.M. Diplomate, Academy of Cognitive Therapy Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Chicago, IL 60611

Dr. Kelly Glazer Baron

Kelly Glazer Baron, PhD, MPH, C. B.S.M.
Diplomate, Academy of Cognitive Therapy
Northwestern University
Feinberg School of Medicine
Chicago, IL 60611

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: In contrast to several previous studies, being a late sleeper was not associated with higher BMI (good news for late sleepers!!) but it was associated with less healthy behaviors, more fast food, fewer vegetables, lower dairy. It may be possible that these late sleepers who are able to get enough sleep can compensate for their poor diet by controlling overall calories or it could possibly lead to weight gain over time if their habits continue over time.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Being a late sleeper was not itself associated with higher weight but still associated with less healthful behaviors. Also, given that sleep timing, in particularly wake up time was associated with lower physical activity, it may be useful to look at interventions to help late sleepers fit in more activity, even if they are not able to fit it in when they first wake up.

Future studies will look at the interaction of timing and sleep duration- considering that many individuals with late sleep times need to curtail their sleep duration to get up in time for work. This can cause a chronic sleep loss that also contributes to diet, physical activity patterns and weight regulation.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

SLEEP 2016 abstract:

Abstract Title: Associations Between Sleep And Circadian Timing With Measures Of Obesity, Diet And Exercise Among Healthy Adults
Abstract ID: 0132
Presentation Date: Sunday, June 12

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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