Marijuana Use and Short-Term Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized for Acute Myocardial

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Lori A. Walker, PhD University of Colorado Dept. of Medicine/Cardiology, Aurora, CO 80045

Dr. Lori Walker

Lori A. Walker, PhD
University of Colorado
Dept. of Medicine/Cardiology,
Aurora, CO 80045

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Walker: Marijuana use is increasing worldwide, in part due to local changes in legal status. Concomitantly, there has been an increase in case studies reporting adverse cardiac events associated with marijuana use. However, little is known about the impact of marijuana use on cardiovascular outcomes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify outcomes in a retrospective analysis of hospitalized patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with reported marijuana use at the time of admission. Administrative hospital records for 8 states between 1994-2013 were screened for adults (age > 18 years) with a diagnosis of AMI. Clinical profiles and outcomes in patients with reported marijuana use were compared to patients with no reported marijuana use. The primary outcome was a composite of death, mechanical ventilation, cardiac arrest, intraaortic balloon pump (IABP) placement, or shock. Secondary outcomes were components of the primary outcome plus coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI).

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Dr. Walker: Associations between marijuana, patient characteristics, and outcomes were determined using step-forward multivariate logistic regression which revealed that marijuana using patients were more likely to be younger, African-American and to use tobacco, cocaine/methamphetamine or alcohol than the control group. Accounting for age, race, and other risk factors such as coronary artery disease, hypertension, tobacco, hyperlipidemia and diabetes mellitus, multivariate logistic regression suggested that marijuana-using patients were less likely to die in-hospital (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.68-1.00) post AMI but more likely to require mechanical ventilation (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06-1.33).

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Walker: Clinicians and patients should be aware that there are likely direct effects of cannabinoids on the cardiovascular system. This preliminary study underscores the need for further basic science research.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Walker: There is a strong need for basic science research aimed at elucidating the signaling pathways evoked by cannabinoids in both cardiac and vascular smooth muscle. Additionally, prospective clinical research aimed at quantifying the effects of marijuana use on cardiac rhythm in healthy patients and those with existing cardiac disease is essential.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Abstract presented at April 2016 ACC

Marijuana Use and Short-Term Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized for Acute Myocardial Infarction Cecelia P. Johnson-Sasso, David Kao, Lori A. Walker, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA
Cecelia P. Johnson-Sasso; David Kao; Lori A. Walker

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2016;67(13_S):569-569. doi:10.1016/S0735-1097(16)30570-8

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

More Medical Research Interviews on MedicalResearch.com

Lori A. Walker, PhD (2016). Marijuana Use and Short-Term Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized for Acute Myocardial MedicalResearch.com

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