Marine Corps V-22 Osprey Used For Aerospace Medical Research at Naval Unit of Dayton Ohio

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Following the landing of a U.S. Marine Core MV-22, Naval Medical Research Unit – Dayton (NAMRU-Dayton) welcomes crew members at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, December 19, 2017. NAMRU-Dayton has been tasked as the lead agency for the Navy to investigate tilt-rotor aircrafts potential effects of flight and vibration on aircrews. Pictured with the USMC Air Test and Evaluation Squadron Two One crew is the coordination team: Ms. Elizabeth Miller, U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine; Captain Rees Lee, Commanding Officer of NAMRU-Dayton; and Lieutenant Commander Matthew Doubrava, Senior Medical Officer at NAMRU-Dayton. (U.S. Navy photo by Public Affairs, Naval Medical Research Unit - Dayton)

Following the landing of a U.S. Marine Core MV-22, Naval Medical Research Unit – Dayton (NAMRU-Dayton) welcomes crew members at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, December 19, 2017. NAMRU-Dayton has been tasked as the lead agency for the Navy to investigate tilt-rotor aircrafts potential effects of flight and vibration on aircrews. Pictured with the USMC Air Test and Evaluation Squadron Two One crew is the coordination team: Ms. Elizabeth Miller, U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine; Captain Rees Lee, Commanding Officer of NAMRU-Dayton; and Lieutenant Commander Matthew Doubrava, Senior Medical Officer at NAMRU-Dayton. (U.S. Navy photo by Public Affairs, Naval Medical Research Unit – Dayton)

Lieutenant Commander Matthew Doubrava
Senior Medical Officer, Naval Medical Research Unit
Dayton, Ohio 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this research? What types of problems will be investigated using the Osprey?

Response: The U.S. Marine Corps V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft will be used to conduct static aerospace medical research in an effort to provide solutions toward preventing musculoskeletal injury to tilt-rotor aircraft crew and en route care training at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Naval Medical Research Unit – Dayton (NAMRU-Dayton) has been tasked as the lead agency for the Navy to investigate tilt-rotor aircrafts potential effects of flight and vibration on aircrews. NAMRU-Dayton scientists will be partnering with the U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, who will be investigating en route care training to figure out the best way for the crew to use the aircraft for that purpose.

A U.S. Marine Core MV-22 tilt-rotor aircraft lands at Wright -Patterson Air Force Base for upcoming military aerospace medical research at Naval Medical Research Unit – Dayton and 711th Human Performance Wing. (U.S. Navy photo by Public Affairs, Naval Medical Research Unit - Dayton)

A U.S. Marine Core MV-22 tilt-rotor aircraft lands at Wright -Patterson Air Force Base for upcoming military aerospace medical research at Naval Medical Research Unit – Dayton and 711th Human Performance Wing. (U.S. Navy photo by Public Affairs, Naval Medical Research Unit – Dayton)

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: The military aviation environment places unique stresses on the human body. As the Navy’s aerospace medical research lab, NAMRU-Dayton is investigating the physiologic and cognitive effects of this environment with the goal of developing solutions to maximize the safety and performance of the aircrew. The MV-22 is a workhorse for the transport of personnel and supplies. The delivery of the MV-22 Osprey to NAMRU-Dayton will allow future research and training to be more realistic and more directly applicable to the real-world environment experienced by Marine Corps, Navy and other military personnel. 

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: We are grateful to United States Marine Corps Air Test and Evaluation Squadron Two One (HX-21), and the 711th Human Performance Wing for navigating all of the requirements related to delivering the aircraft to NAMRU-Dayton. There was a great deal of cooperation between Air force, Navy, and Marine Corps to bring this aircraft to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base for military medical research. 

Citation:

Marine Corps V-22 Osprey Used to Conduct Aerospace Medical Research at Naval Medical Research Unit of Dayton. 

http://www.wpafb.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/1402378/naval-medical-research-unit-dayton-accepts-mv-22-osprey-for-research/ 

 

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