More Birth Defects In Children Born Through Assisted Reproductive Technology

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Sheree L. Boulet, DrPH, MPH Division of Reproductive Health Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, Georgia

Dr. Sheree Boulet

Sheree L. Boulet, DrPH, MPH
Division of Reproductive Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, Georgia

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Boulet: Findings from some studies have suggested that children conceived with assisted reproductive technology (ART) have increased risks of birth defects compared with spontaneously conceived children. Many of these studies were limited by a small sample size and were unable to assess risks associated with specific ART procedures.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Dr. Boulet: We found that singleton infants conceived using assisted reproductive technology were 1.4 times more likely to have a non-chromosomal birth defect compared with other infants, and the risks were highest for gastrointestinal and musculoskeletal defects. However, when our study was restricted to only ART-conceived infants, no single procedure substantially increased the risk for birth defects. This suggests that the higher risk of birth defects may be due to underlying issues related to infertility, rather than to ART itself.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Boulet: Assisted reproductive technology remains a safe and effective treatment for infertility, but these findings can add to the conversation providers and patients have when discussing ART risks.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Boulet: More research is needed to clearly address the risk of birth defects due to assisted reproductive technology, including the association between certain procedures and risk of birth defects. 

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Dr. Boulet: As use of assisted reproductive technology continues to grow, it becomes increasingly important to study the long-term outcomes of children conceived using this technology.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Boulet SL, Kirby RS, Reefhuis J, et al. Assisted Reproductive Technology and Birth Defects Among Liveborn Infants in Florida, Massachusetts, and Michigan, 2000-2010.JAMA Pediatr. Published online April 04, 2016. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.4934.

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

More Medical Research Interviews on MedicalResearch.com

Dr. Sheree Boulet (2016). More Birth Defects In Children Born Through Assisted Reproductive Technology MedicalResearch.com

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