More Moles On Right Arm May Mean Higher Melanoma Risk

Simone Ribero, M.D., Ph.D. University of Turin Department of Medical Sciences Italy &King’s College London Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology St Thomas’ campus London, UK

Dr. Simon Ribero

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Simone Ribero,  M.D., Ph.D. 
University of Turin
Department of Medical Sciences
Italy & King’s College London
Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology
St Thomas’ campus
London, UK

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Ribero: The total body naevus count is the principal risk factor for melanoma. having more than 100 moles increases  6 times the risk of developping a melanoma.

In our study we described a model to predict the total number naevus count with the count of one arm.

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Ribero: They could use our method to screen quickly patients at risk from the ones at lower risk of melanoma.

Medical Research: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Ribero: This methods should be included in clinical trials to have a good estimation of the phenotype of a patients. Naevus count has been reported to be associated not only at melanoma risk, but also at survival in melanoma patients.

Citation:

Prediction of high naevus count in a healthy UK population to estimate melanoma risk

Ribero, D. Zugna, S. Osella-Abate2, D. Glass P. Nathan, T. Spector1and V. Bataille1,7

British Journal Dermatology DOI: 10.1111/bjd.14216

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Simone Ribero, M.D., Ph.D. (2015). More Moles On Right Arm May Mean Higher Melanoma Risk