Multiple Pregnancies May Raise Metabolic Syndrome Risk in Latina Women

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Catherine J. Vladutiu, PhD, MPH Research Assistant Professor, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology Chapel Hill, NC

Dr. Catherine Vladutiu

Catherine J. Vladutiu, PhD, MPH
Research Assistant Professor, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology
Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology
Chapel Hill, NC

Medical Research: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Vladutiu: During pregnancy, women experience physiological changes and are at risk of pregnancy-related complications, some of which are associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular health outcomes in later life.  Physiologic adaptations occurring across successive pregnancies may be associated with an even higher risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Previous studies have found an association between higher parity (i.e., number of live births) and the metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, no studies have examined this association in a Hispanic/Latina population. Hispanic women have a higher prevalence of the MetS than non-Hispanic women.  Latinos are also the fastest growing minority population in the U.S. and Hispanic/Latina women report higher fertility and birth rates than their non-Hispanic counterparts.

Medical Research: What are the main findings?

Dr. Vladutiu: Abdominal obesity was the most prevalent component of the metabolic syndrome in this population of Hispanic/Latina women and was highest among those with 4 or more live births, while elevated fasting glucose was the least prevalent component across all parity categories.  Multi-parity of four or more live births was associated with a higher prevalence of selected components of the metabolic syndrome, particularly abdominal obesity, low HDL cholesterol, and elevated fasting glucose.

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Vladutiu: Obtaining a detailed pregnancy history, including the number of prior live births, may be informative when evaluating cardiovascular risk for women.  Early identification of high-risk women based on this information provides an opportunity for both primordial and primary prevention of CVD.   

Medical Research: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Vladutiu: Future studies could provide a better characterization of the links between pregnancy, adiposity, and body fat distribution to further examine the associations between parity and components of the MetS in a Hispanic/Latina population.  Additional assessments of how these associations vary by pregnancy complications (e.g., gestational diabetes, preeclampsia) may also be informative.

Citation:

Circulation publication
Parity and Components of the Metabolic Syndrome Among U.S. Hispanic/Latina Women: Results from the HCHS/SOL Study

Catherine J. Vladutiu, PhD,Anna Maria Siega-Riz, PhDDaniela Sotres-Alvarez, DrPH,

Alison M. Stuebe, MDAndy Ni, PhD,Karen M. Tabb, PhD,Linda C. Gallo, PhD,JoNell E. Potter, ARNP, PhD and Gerardo Heiss, MD, PhD

Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2016;9:S62S69,doi:10.1161/CIRCOUTCOMES.115.002464

 

Dr. Catherine J. Vladutiu (2016). Multiple Pregnancies May Raise Metabolic Syndrome Risk in Latina Women MedicalResearch.com

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