Regular, Long-term Resistance Training or Jump-Training Increases Bone Mass

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Pamela S. Hinton, Ph.D. Associate Professor & Director of Graduate Studies Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology Columbia MO 65211

Dr. Hinton

Pamela S. Hinton, Ph.D.
Associate Professor & Director of Graduate Studies
Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology
Columbia MO 65211

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: This study builds on our previous work showing that weight-bearing, high-impact physical activity throughout the lifespan is associated with greater bone mass in men.  We previously conducted a 12-month randomized trial of the effectiveness of resistance training versus jump training to increase bone mass in men with low bone density of the hip or lumbar spine.

The current study is a follow up study investigating how exercise might work to increase bone mass.

The main findings are that exercise reduced circulating levels of a bone protein that inhibits bone formation (sclerostin) and increased levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), a hormone with osteogenic effects.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Regular, long-term resistance training or jump-training increases bone mass, in part, by altering proteins that impact bone formation.

The take home message from our body of work is that men of all ages should engage in regular weight-bearing exercise to optimize bone health.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Does exercise add an additional benefit to osteoporosis drugs or maintain bone mass gains associated with osteoporosis drugs during “drug holidays”?

No disclosures.  Our study was funded by NIH.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Pamela S. Hinton, Peggy Nigh, John Thyfault.Serum sclerostin decreases following 12months of resistance- or jump-training in men with low bone mass. Bone, 2017; 96: 85 DOI: 1016/j.bone.2016.10.011

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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