Relationship Between Physician Burnout and Quality of Care

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Michelle P. Salyers Ph.D.</strong> Professor, Psychology Director, Clinical Psychology Program Director, ACT Center of Indiana Affiliated Scientist, Regenstrief Institute, Inc. Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, IN

Dr. Salyers

Michelle P. Salyers Ph.D.
Professor, Psychology
Director, Clinical Psychology Program
Director, ACT Center of Indiana
Affiliated Scientist, Regenstrief Institute, Inc.
Indiana University-Purdue University
Indianapolis, IN

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Professional burnout among healthcare providers is receiving more attention in research and in public press. There have long been speculations that the level of burnout may be related to quality of care provided, and many studies have been done linking provider burnout with different aspects of quality of care.

This study brings together that literature, to summarize and quantify the link between professional burnout in healthcare provider and the quality of care they provide. We were able to combine data from 82 independent samples, across health care disciplines, settings, and types of quality indicators. We found small to medium relationships between provider burnout and indicators of quality of care.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Although we cannot make causal statements, provider burnout and quality of care are related. As we (researchers, policy makers, administrators) are paying attention to issues of providing high quality care, improving patient satisfaction, and reducing errors, we also need to be addressing issues related to our healthcare providers’ well-being.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Most of the studies were based on provider or patient perceptions of quality and safety. We had a very limited number of studies that measured the relationship between burnout and adverse events, for example. Future research should go beyond self report or patient report to examine relationships with external indicators of quality or safety.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

J Gen Intern Med. 2016 Oct 26. [Epub ahead of print]
The Relationship Between Professional Burnout and Quality and Safety in Healthcare: A Meta-Analysis.
Salyers MP1,2, Bonfils KA3,4, Luther L3,4, Firmin RL3,4, White DA3,4, Adams EL3,4, Rollins AL3,4,5.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27785668

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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