Rotational Shift Work Linked To Increased Risk of Hypertension, Especially in Men

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Sandhya Manohar, MBBS, Nephrology Fellow Project mentor: Sandra M. Herrmann, MD Department of Nephrology and Hypertension Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

Dr. Sandhya Manohar

Sandhya Manohar, MBBS, Nephrology Fellow
Project mentor: Sandra M. Herrmann, MD
Department of Nephrology and Hypertension
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: In the last few decades advances in the field of industrialization and technology has turned our world into a 24-7 work zone. Many organizations have turned to a shift system to keep up with the demands of the new world. The consequent changes to our circadian rhythm have resulted in dramatic effects to our body’s physiology. Reports have been surfacing of higher rates of diabetes, obesity, and even cancer in this shift work population.

The risk of hypertension though was controversial and so we set out to review this in our meta-analysis.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: Our meta-analysis showed that there was a significant association between hypertension and rotational shift work with an overall 1.34 fold higher risk in this population as compared to those in daytime work alone.

This risk was more significant in men than women.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Our life in the fast-paced 24-7 world requires us to adapt by developing a shift based work system.

Those that work in a shift work system need to be aware of their increased risk to chronic health conditions like hypertension. Earlier and routine screening for hypertension will be needed especially in men. 

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation: NKF Spring Clinical Meetings Abstract:

ASSOCIATIONS OF ROTATIONAL SHIFTWORK AND NIGHT SHIFT STATUS WITH HYPERTENSION: A META-ANALYSIS 

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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