Selective Targeting Can Improve Deep Brain Stimulation For Parkinson’s

Dr. Ilse S. Pienaar Honorary Lecturer in Neuroscience at Imperial College London (& Snr. Lecturer in Cellular Pathology, Northumbria University) Centre for Neuroinflammation & Neurodegeneration Division of Brain Sciences Faculty of Medicine Imperial College London Hammersmith Hospital Campus London United KingdomMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Ilse S. Pienaar

Honorary Lecturer in Neuroscience at Imperial College London
(& Snr. Lecturer in Cellular Pathology, Northumbria University)
Centre for Neuroinflammation & Neurodegeneration
Division of Brain Sciences Faculty of Medicine
Imperial College London
Hammersmith Hospital Campus
London United Kingdom

 

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Pienaar: A highly heterogeneous brainstem structure, the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has been deemed a promising target for the delivery of deep-brain stimulation (DBS), to alleviate aspects of Parkinson’s disease (PD), especially gait and postural instability. However, optimal therapeutic targeting of the PPN has been hampered due to DBS being unable to discriminate between cell types being targeted. We optomised a novel technique, Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADD) in a rat model of PD, by which to target only the PPN cholinergic neurons. A series of behavioral tests revealed that selective stimulation of the PPN cholinergics completely reverses gait problems and postural instability in the PD rats.

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Pienaar: Selective targeting of neuronal types within  deep-brain stimulation targets in patients diagnosed with neurodegenerative disease may become a possibility within the next 5-10 years. This study illustrates the potential of this approach for alleviating specific symptoms of the disease.

Medical Research: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Pienaar: Other neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s has shown potential to benefit from  deep-brain stimulation intervention also. DREADD technology can be used to dissect out the relative contribution made by select subpopulations of neurons in vulnerable brain structures towards not only the disease phenotype, but to reverse disease symptoms, following a targeted therapeutic approach.

Citation:

Pharmacogenetic stimulation of cholinergic pedunculopontine neurons reverses motor deficits in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease

Ilse S. Pienaar12*, Sarah E. Gartside3, Puneet Sharma1, Vincenzo De Paola4, Sabine Gretenkord3, Dominic Withers4, Joanna L. Elson56 and David T. Dexter1

Molecular Neurodegeneration 2015, 10:47  doi:10.1186/s13024-015-0044-5

MedicalResearch.com is not a forum for the exchange of personal medical information, advice or the promotion of self-destructive behavior (e.g., eating disorders, suicide). While you may freely discuss your troubles, you should not look to the Website for information or advice on such topics. Instead, we recommend that you talk in person with a trusted medical professional.

The information on MedicalResearch.com is provided for educational purposes only, and is in no way intended to diagnose, cure, or treat any medical or other condition. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health and ask your doctor any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. In addition to all other limitations and disclaimers in this agreement, service provider and its third party providers disclaim any liability or loss in connection with the content provided on this website.

Dr. Ilse S. Pienaar (2015). Selective Targeting Can Improve Deep Brain Stimulation For Parkinson’s 

No Comments

Post A Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.