Richard McManus MA PhD MBBS FRCGP FRCP Professor of Primary Care Dr. McManus chairs the Blood Pressure Monitoring Working Party of the British Hypertension Society Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences 

Self-monitoring of Blood Pressure in Pregnant Individuals: Does it Improve Blood Pressure Control?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Richard McManus MA PhD MBBS FRCGP FRCP Professor of Primary Care Dr. McManus chairs the Blood Pressure Monitoring Working Party of the British Hypertension Society Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences 

Prof. McManus

Richard McManus MA PhD MBBS FRCGP FRCP
Professor of Primary Care
Dr. McManus chairs the Blood Pressure Monitoring Working Party
of the British Hypertension Society
Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences 

MedicalResearch.com:  What is the background for this study? 

Response: About one in ten people who are pregnant develop high blood pressure and almost half of these go onto to have pre-eclampsia. Many pregnant women and individuals are already measuring their own blood pressure – well over half of those with high blood pressure in a recent large survey in the UK but until recently there were no data to support this.
MedicalResearch.com:  What are the main findings?

Response: BUMP2 included 850 pregnant individuals with chronic hypertension (ie started before pregnancy) or gestational hypertension (high blood pressure during pregnancy only), use of self-monitoring of blood pressure with telemonitoring resulted in no significant difference in midwife/hospital measured systolic blood pressure compared with usual care alone.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report? 

Response: Importantly the trial did not find any problems with self-monitoring and high levels of acceptability. This was the first big trial of self-monitoring in hypertensive pregnancy and there are several others in the pipeline that will give further information.

In the meantime, those who are pregnant and who wish to self-monitor can continue to do this and are advised to share their readings with their midwives/other clinicians. 

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

 Response: Future research should consider adjusting protocols and/or antenatal regimes to assess whether different methods of implementing self-monitoring of blood pressure might be more advantageous. In addition, better understanding of the consequences of white coat hypertension (normal home blood pressure but raised blood pressure in the clinic) would help delivery of care based on home blood pressure readings.

Any disclosures? Prof McManus is employed by Oxford University who receive licencing payments from Sensyne for the telemonitoring system used in the trial.

Citation:

Chappell LC, Tucker KL, Galal U, et al. Effect of Self-monitoring of Blood Pressure on Blood Pressure Control in Pregnant Individuals With Chronic or Gestational HypertensionThe BUMP 2 Randomized Clinical TrialJAMA. 2022;327(17):1666–1678. doi:10.1001/jama.2022.4726

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May 4, 2022 @ 2:52 pm

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