Study Finds Kidneys With AKI Can Be Safely Transplanted

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Chirag R Parikh, M.B.B.S., Ph.D. Director,Division of Nephrology Professor of Medicine School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, Maryland 21287

Dr. Parikh

Chirag R Parikh, M.B.B.S., Ph.D.
Director,Division of Nephrology
Professor of Medicine
School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University
Baltimore, Maryland 21287 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: The initial study idea stemmed from our earlier cohort studies of predictors of delayed graft function after kidney transplantation.  We previously found that kidneys from donors with Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) were more often discarded than kidneys from donors without AKI, and transplanted donor AKI kidneys were at increased risk for delayed graft function.

It was important to determine whether that increased risk for delayed graft function also translated into worse long-term outcomes for recipients of kidneys from donors with AKI.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: 2,430 kidneys transplanted from 1,298 donors—585 (24 percent) of them with AKI—We found no significant differences in rates of organ rejection among kidneys from deceased donors with or without AKI. We found no evidence that factors such as the amount of time an organ is chilled and left without blood supply before transplantation had any impact on recipient outcomes for those who received AKI kidneys. 

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: This should reassure the general public that acutely injured deceased-donor kidneys considered acceptable by their transplant teams are not more likely to fail compared with non-injured kidneys from otherwise similar donors. 

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: Kidney transplant potentially saves the health care system more than $250,000 per year for each patient in costs related to dialysis treatments, medications and hospitalizations, says Parikh: “Hopefully this study will provide confidence to surgeons that they can transplant AKI kidneys and expect good outcomes.”

Citation:

Deceased-donor acute kidney injury is not associated with kidney allograft failure
Hall, Isaac E. et al.
Kidney International , Volume 0 , Issue 0
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.kint.2018.08.047

Dec 18, 2018 @ 12:39 am

 

 

 

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