Study Finds Only 1/3 of Melanomas Arise in Pre-Existing Moles

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Riccardo Pampena MD and  Caterina Longo, MD, PhD Dermatology Unit University of Modena and Reggio Emilia Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova-IRCCS Reggio Emilia Italy

Mole or Nevus
Wikipedia

Riccardo Pampena MD and
Caterina Longo, MD, PhD
Dermatology Unit
University of Modena and Reggio Emilia
Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova-IRCCS
Reggio Emilia Italy

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: High heterogeneity has been reported in previous studies on the ratio of melanoma associated with moles (nevus-associated melanomas).

Despite this heterogeneity, researchers agree that some melanomas may develop in conjunction with a pre-existing mole.

We know that nevus-associated melanomas are usually located on the trunk and more frequently occur in younger patients than de novo melanomas (not nevus-associated).

Defining the risk for a melanoma to arise in association with a pre-existing mole is important in order to define the best strategies for early melanoma diagnosis.

The main finding of our study is that only one third of melanomas arose from a pre-existing mole, in fact the majority were de novo.

We also found that nevus-associated melanomas were less aggressive than de novo.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Response: Patients and physicians should be aware that a patient with a lot of moles is at higher risk to develop a melanoma but themelanoma will likely appear on his skin without moles!

For this reason, complete skin examination could be a more effective follow up than follow up of selected atypical nevi alone for early melanoma diagnosis.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Future research should define why certain melanomas are associated with nevi.

In fact, even though chance could play a role, this association occurs more frequently than it would be expected by chance alone.

Also, the less aggressive behavior of nevus-associated melanoma should be confirmed by future studies.

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: The last finding of our study regards association of nevus-associated melanomas with atypical (dysplastic) or non-atypical (non-dysplastic) moles.

We found no differences at this purpose; this seems to indicate that melanoma doesn’t develop from malignant degeneration of a pre-existing mole even when it is nevus-associated.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Riccardo Pampena, MD et al. A meta-analysis of nevus-associated melanoma: Prevalence and practical implications. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, August 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.jaad.2017.06.149

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/08/170829093534.htm

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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