Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake and Health Related Knowledge

Sohyun Park, PhD, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, GA 30341MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Sohyun Park, PhD,
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, GA 30341

MedicalResearch.com:  What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Park: Nearly 1 out of 3 U.S. adults (30.5%) consumed sugar-sweetened beverages at least 1 time per day; 20% consumed sugar-sweetened beverages at least 2 times per day. About 8 out of 10 adults agreed that drinking sugar-sweetened beverages can contribute to weight gain. However, 8 of 10 adults also did not know the actual calorie content of a 24-oz fountain soda. After controlling for sociodemographic factors, adults who were neutral (neither agreed nor disagreed) that drinking sugar-sweetened beverages can contribute to weight gain were more than 1-and-a-half times more likely to consume sugar-sweetened beverages at least 2 times per day. Conversely, knowledge about the calorie content of a 24-oz fountain soda was not associated with sugar-sweetened beverage intake.

MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected?

Dr. Park: We hypothesized that correct knowledge about the calorie content of a 24-oz fountain soda would be associated with a lower sugar-sweetened beverage intake. However, unlike our hypothesis, knowledge about the calorie content of regular soda was not significantly associated with consuming sugar-sweetened beverage at least 2 times daily among U.S. adults after controlling for sociodemographic factors.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Park:  Knowledge about the adverse effects of sugar-sweetened beverage intake is significantly associated with sugar-sweetened beverage intake among U.S. adults. Thus, clinicians should consider counseling their patients about the potential contribution of excess energy intake from sugar-sweetened beverages to weight gain, as this counseling could potentially contribute to lowered intake and lower prevalence of obesity.

Also, while knowledge about the calorie content of a 24-oz fountain soda was not associated with sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, health education on the calorie content of sugar-sweetened beverages may still be valuable because most adults did not know the actual calorie content of sugar-sweetened beverages.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Park:  The associations from our study are one point in time (cross-sectional), so studies that follow the same individuals over time (longitudinal) are needed to explore whether changes in knowledge about sugar-sweetened beverage calorie content modify sugar-sweetened beverage intake and to further explore what other knowledge might be associated with sugar-sweetened beverage consumption.

Citation:

The Relationship between Health-Related Knowledge and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake among US Adults

Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics – 23 December 2013 (10.1016/j.jand.2013.11.003)
Sohyun Park, Stephen Onufrak, Bettylou Sherry, and Heidi M. Blanck

 

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