Taltz (ixekizumab) Can Improve Palmoplantar Psoriasis For Up To 60 Weeks

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Alan Menter MD Texas Dermatology Associates

Dr. Alan Menter

Dr. Alan Menter MD
Texas Dermatology Associates

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Psoriasis on the palms and soles of the feet—also known as palmoplantar psoriasis of which there are 2 variants, plaque type or pustular, —can significantly affect a person’s quality of life and is often difficult-to-treat with available treatments. Researchers in this study set out to determine the efficacy and safety of Taltz (ixekizumab) through 60 weeks among patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis with significant palmoplantar involvement. Plaque psoriasis is the most common form of psoriasis appearing as raised, red patches covered with a silvery white buildup of dead skin cells which are often painful or itchy. This study was an analysis of UNCOVER-3, a Phase 3, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

In the first 12 weeks of this study, patients were randomized to receive placebo, etanercept (50 mg, twice-weekly) or 80 mg of Taltz every two weeks or every four weeks, following an initial starting dose of 160 mg. At 12 weeks, all patients received open-label Taltz every four weeks through 60 weeks.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

• Taltz was superior to placebo through 60 weeks among patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis with significant palmoplantar involvement.

• At 12 weeks, treatment with Taltz resulted in significant improvements in plaque-type Palmoplantar Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PPASI) scores compared to placebo (p≤0.05). Among patients randomized to receive Taltz in the 12-week induction period:
o More than 65 percent achieved ≥75% improvement (PPASI 75)
o More than 45 percent of patients achieved 100% improvement (PPASI 100)

• These results were maintained at 60 weeks, with comparable PPASI 75 and PPASI 100 response rates among patients who had received Taltz at baseline and those who had received placebo or U.S.-approved etanercept in the induction period, followed by treatment with Taltz after 12 weeks.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Psoriasis with both forms of palmoplantar involvement can be difficult to treat, and many patients are still looking for a treatment that can provide high levels of skin clearance. These study results show Taltz can provide significant improvement in psoriasis plaques up to 60 weeks, including virtually clear or completely clear skin in harder-to-treat areas like the plaque form of psoriasis on palms and soles of the feet.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Despite the availability of existing treatment options for psoriasis, there are still many people living with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis looking for an alternative, including those with both variants of palmoplantar involvement. Plaque psoriasis is the most common form of psoriasis appearing as raised, red patches covered with a silvery white buildup of dead skin cells which are often painful or itchy, while palmoplantar psoriasis is primarily located on the palms and soles of the feet. This research adds to the growing body of evidence supporting the use of Taltz, and reinforces Lilly’s commitment to research underway evaluating Taltz for the potential treatment of active psoriatic arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology Congress abstract:

Efficacy and Safety of Ixekizumab in Patients with Moderate-to-Severe Plaque Psoriasis Plus Significant Palmoplantar Involvement: 60-Week Outcomes from UNCOVER-3

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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