Tooth Enamel Defects May Reflect Perinatal Exposure to Bisphenol A

Sylvie Babajko, PhD Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers Inserm UMR_S 1138 Laboratoire de Physiopathologie Orale Moléculaire 75006 Paris cedex 06MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Sylvie Babajko, PhD
Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers
Inserm UMR_S 1138
Laboratoire de Physiopathologie Orale Moléculaire
75006 Paris cedex 06

MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Babajko: The environment has become increasingly contaminated by various pollutants. This has led to an increase in the incidence and gravity of known pathologies and/or the emergence of new pathologies. In 2001, a distinct enamel pathology called molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) was described. It is diagnosed by white to brown creamy lesions affecting permanent first molars and frequently permanent incisors too. These teeth are sensitive and susceptible to caries. MIH prevalence turns around 15-18 % of 6 to 9 years-old children in studied populations all over the world. To date, MIH etiology remains unclear. However, given that MIH affects those teeth that are undergoing mineralization around the time of birth, MIH is indicative of some adverse event(s) occurring during early childhood that impact on enamel development. Interestingly, susceptibility to BPA in human is the highest during the same period of time.

Our experimental data (1, 2) showed that BPA may be a causal agent of MIH and that BPA irreversibly impacts amelogenesis via steroid hormone pathway.

MedicalResearch: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Babajko: We propose that affected teeth could be used as early marker of exposure to EDCs acting as BPA.

The EDCs (especially BPA) are suspected of being involved in a variety of pathologies such as obesity, infertility, behavioral disorders or even hormone-dependent cancers. Therefore, clinicians should examine the teeth of their patients affected by one of these pathologies. And in particular, they should take into account MIH (if any) as an easy marker of exposure to these agents.

Similarly, parents of children affected by MIH should be particularly vigilant to limit exposure to EDCs (eg avoiding industrial food packed in plastic containers that is probably the main source of contamination). Patients should request information to their dentist on the materials used for restoration or to protect from caries to be sure they’re BPA free.

MedicalResearch: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Babajko: Epidemiological data would help to identify the potential correlation between MIH and other endocrine pathologies (to be precisely characterized). Such data are expected to argue the use of affected teeth as easy (and cheap) marker of exposure to EDCs.

(1): Jedeon et al., Am J Pathol, 2013, 183(1):108-18

(2): Jedeon et al., Endocrinology, 2014, 155(9):3365-75

ENDO15 March 2015

Enamel Defects Reflect Perinatal Exposure to Bisphenol A

Sylvie Babajko, Katia Jedeon, et al.

-Research Centre of Cordeliers, INSERM UMRS 1138, Laboratory of Molecular Oral Pathophysiology, Paris, France

-Paris-Diderot University, UFR Odontology, Paris, France
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Sylvie Babajko, PhD (2015). Tooth Enamel Defects May Reflect Perinatal Exposure to Bisphenol A