MRSA-Staph

UF Study Finds Adults Colonized with MRSA Bacteria Have Higher Mortality Risk

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Arch G. Mainous III, PhD Professor Department of Health Services Research, Management and Policy Professor and Vice Chair for Research Department of Community Health and Family Medicine University of Florida

Prof. Mainous

Arch G. Mainous III, PhD
Professor
Department of Health Services Research, Management and Policy
Professor and Vice Chair for Research
Department of Community Health and Family Medicine
University of Florida

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: We are always concerned about infections from antibiotic resistant bacteria. When the bacteria are resistant to our current treatments this lengthens the time and severity of the illness. Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of community and healthcare associated infections. These range from skin infections to invasive infections and even death. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) is of particular concern and is a burden on the health care system. Importantly, patients colonized, not infected, with MRSA are more likely to develop MRSA infections and patients with MRSA infections have increased risk of hospital length of stay and even death.

We are always concerned about infections from antibiotic resistant bacteria. When the bacteria are resistant to our current treatments this lengthens the time and severity of the illness. Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of community and healthcare associated infections. These range from skin infections to invasive infections and even death. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) is of particular concern and is a burden on the health care system. Importantly, patients colonized, not infected, with MRSA are more likely to develop MRSA infections and patients with MRSA infections have increased risk of hospital length of stay and even death.

MedicalResearch.com: Where on the body is S.aureus typically found?

Response: It is many times found in the person’s nose, groin and in their armpit.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: The main findings of our study are that among middle and older aged adults who are colonized with MRSA they are basically twice as likely to die in the next 11 years than adults who are not colonized. Further, adults who are colonized with S. aureus in general are not at increased risk. This suggests that the antibiotic resistant bacteria not the bacteria itself carries the risk. Importantly, these adults were screened for S. aureus and MRSA in a national study. It would be very unusual for the average adult to know if they are colonized with MRSA. Thus, millions of adults are carrying a bacteria that doubles their likelihood of dying in the next 11 years

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: The readers should be aware that they may not have a current infection or feel bad but they could be carrying a very serious bacteria. 

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

 Response: A large trial showed that decolonization of MRSA from patients as they were discharged from the hospital led to a 30% lower risk of MRSA infection over the next year. Further, the decolonization decreased the risk of any infection was decreased. That study was only for a year and focused on patients discharged from the hospital. Our data extend our knowledge of MRSA colonization in the community and health risk to more than 10 years. The next step is to see whether selective screening for MRSA colonization and decolonization of patients in the community can decrease the health risks of MRSA colonization. 

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: Our results show that just because you aren’t sick currently doesn’t mean that you may not have a risk factor for a serious outcome, even death. Prevention of disease and death should be our priority.

Citation

JABFM
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Colonization and Mortality Risk Among Community Adults Aged 40-85

Arch G. Mainous, PhD; Benjamin J. Rooks, MS; Peter J. Carek, MD, MS
March/April 2021

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Mar 31, 2021 @ 12:04 am 

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