Uterine Microbiome Plays Key Role in IVF Success

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Carlos Simón, M.D., Ph. D. Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology. Valencia University, Spain Scientific Director, Igenomix SL. Adjunct Clinical Professor, Department of Ob/Gyn, Stanford University, CA Adjunct Professor, Department of Ob/Gyn, Baylor College of Medicine, TX

Dr. Carlos Simón

Carlos Simón, M.D., Ph. D.
Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology. Valencia University, Spain
Scientific Director, Igenomix SL.
Adjunct Clinical Professor, Department of Ob/Gyn, Stanford University, CA
Adjunct Professor, Department of Ob/Gyn, Baylor College of Medicine, TX

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The main findings of this study reside in the concept that the uterine cavity, which has been classically considered as a sterile organ, possess its own microbiome and that the composition of this uterine microbiome have a functional impact on the reproductive outcome of IVF patients.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Low abundance of Lactobacilli in the endometrium is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, even if those patients had a receptive endometrium.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: There is still a long way for the study of the endometrial microbiome not only at the bacterial level but also related to viruses and yeasts.

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: This is a new approach for the improvement of assisted reproductive techniques that can add valuable information for the management of those IVF patients with recurrent implantation failure or pregnancy loss.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

 Inmaculada Moreno, Francisco M. Codoñer, Felipe Vilella, Diana Valbuena, Juan F. Martinez-Blanch, Jorge Jimenez-Almazán, Roberto Alonso, Pilar Alamá, Jose Remohí, Antonio Pellicer, Daniel Ramon, Carlos Simon. Evidence that the endometrial microbiota has an effect on implantation success or failure. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2016; 215 (6): 684 DOI: 10.1016/j.ajog.2016.09.075

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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