Anti-Cancer Agent May Have Simultaneous Regenerative Properties

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Lawrence Lum, Ph.D. Associate Professor Virginia Murchison Linthicum Scholar in Medical Research UT Southwestern Medical Center

Dr. Lum

Lawrence Lum, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Virginia Murchison Linthicum Scholar in Medical Research
UT Southwestern Medical Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Scarring of the adult heart due to excessive fibrotic responses is common after a heart attack, or following radiation therapy for the treatment of certain cancers. We have identified an anti-cancer agent currently in clinical development called WNT-974 that decreases fibrotic responses and improves heart function following myocardial infarction in mice. This unexpected observation was the outcome of a study focused on identifying unwanted adult tissue toxicities associated with this class of chemicals.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Anti-cancer agents in development such as WNT-974 that disable the production of secreted Wnt proteins should also be evaluated for their potential utility in regenerative medicine.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Other adult tissues in addition to the heart may also see improvements in regeneration following transient suppression of Wnt protein production as a consequence of mitigated fibrotic responses. These possibilities should be further investigated.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Jesung Moon, Huanyu Zhou, Li-shu Zhang, Wei Tan, Ying Liu, Shanrong Zhang, Lorraine K. Morlock, Xiaoping Bao, Sean P. Palecek, Jian Q. Feng, Noelle S. Williams, James F. Amatruda, Eric N. Olson, Rhonda Bassel-Duby, and Lawrence Lum
Blockade to pathological remodeling of infarcted heart tissue using a porcupine antagonist
PNAS 2017 ; published ahead of print January 31, 2017, doi:10.1073/pnas.1621346114

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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