Bariatric Surgery Associated With Reduced Risk of Obesity-Related Cancers

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Daniel P. Schauer, MD, MSc Associate Professor, Internal Medicine University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Division of General Internal Medicine Cincinnati OH 45267-0535

Dr. Schauer

Daniel P. Schauer, MD, MSc
Associate Professor, Internal Medicine
University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
Division of General Internal Medicine
Cincinnati OH 45267-0535

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Obesity is associated with many types of cancer and bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe obesity.  We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients undergoing bariatric surgery between 2005 and 2012 with follow-up through 2014 using data from Kaiser Permanente using 5 study sites. The study included 22,198 patients who had bariatric surgery matched to 66,427 nonsurgical patients with severe obesity.

We found that bariatric surgery was associated with a reduced risk of cancer.  The risk reduction was greatest for the cancers that are associated with obesity including postmenopausal breast, endometrial, colon, and pancreatic cancers, as well as esophageal adenocarcinoma.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: These findings reinforce the importance of treating obesity as a disease.  Many of the long term complications of obesity, such as cancer, can be prevented with effective weight loss treatment using bariatric surgery.  The evidence is overwhelming that surgical treatment of severe obesity is effective and can have a large impact on the health of this population.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: There remain a lot of unanswered questions regarding weight loss and cancer risk.  It remains unclear if there is a benefit in men and if the various bariatric surgery procedures have differing effects.

The study was funded by the National Cancer Institute.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Obesity Week 2017 abstract:

BARIATRIC SURGERY AND THE RISK OF CANCER IN A MULTISITE COHORT OF 88,625 ADULTS WITH SEVERE OBESITY 

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions. 

 

 

 

 

 

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