Study Finds Statin Use Not Associated With Breast Cancer Prognosis

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Amanda Leiter, MD MSCR Medical Resident, Internal Medicine Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Dr. Leiter

Amanda Leiter, MD MSCR
Medical Resident, Internal Medicine
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Black women are more likely than White women to have breast cancer with poor prognostic features, which cannot be completely explained by differences in screening, treatment and established risk factors for breast cancer mortality. Black women have higher rates of obesity, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia when compared to White women. Prior studies have shown a decreased risk of breast cancer recurrence and improved survival with statin use.

As statins have an association with decreased breast cancer recurrence and potentially improved survival, disparities in statin use between Black and White women with breast cancer are important to investigate. We aimed to elucidate whether or not statin use differs between Black and White women with breast cancer and if racial disparities in breast cancer can be partially explained by differences in statin use.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: Statin use was not associated with breast cancer prognosis in our sample of breast cancer patients. Black women were more likely than White women have worse breast cancer prognosis, and to be obese, have insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Our study does not show an association of statin use and breast cancer prognosis. Importantly, we found that among breast cancer patients, Black women were just as likely as White women to take statins. Black women were more likely than White women to be obese, have insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia, yet few studies have specifically investigated how these differences are associated with racial disparities in breast cancer outcomes.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: More studies with larger populations and longer follow-up should investigate the differential effects of dyslipidemia, statin use, obesity, and insulin resistance on breast cancer outcomes in Black and White women.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation: Study presented at 2017 ENDO Meeting

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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