Ying Liu, MD, PhD Assistant Professor Washington University School of Medicine Department of Surgery, Division of Public Health Sciences St. Louis, MO

Triple Negative Breast Cancer More Deadly in African Americans

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Ying Liu, MD, PhD Assistant Professor Washington University School of Medicine Department of Surgery, Division of Public Health Sciences St. Louis, MO

Dr. Ying Liu

Ying Liu, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor
Washington University School of Medicine
Department of Surgery, Division of Public Health Sciences
St. Louis, MO

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Non-Hispanic African American women experience a disproportional burden of poor breast cancer outcomes than non-Hispanic White women, which is associated with a higher incidence of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), more advanced stages at diagnosis, and lower treatment adherence. However, the differences in clinical treatment and outcomes between African American women with TNBC and their White counterparts have not been well defined.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: In a nationally representative cohort of TNBC patients, we observed that African American women were less likely to receive chemotherapy and surgery than White women. However, the risk of death of breast cancer remained significantly higher in African American women compared with White women after accounting for the differences in demographic, health insurance, neighborhood, clinicopathological, and treatment factors.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: This population-based study showed that the risk of breast cancer mortality was significantly increased by 28% in African American vs White women with TNBC, which is partially explained by their underutilization of surgery and chemotherapy.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: Future studies that focus on tumor biology and treatment efficacy in TNBC from African American women would advance our understanding the drivers of TNBC outcome disparities. It is also important to better understand the role of treatment details, lifestyles, co-morbid health conditions, and social factors in explaining the excess risk of mortality in African American women with TNBC.

Citation:

Cho B, et al. Evaluation of racial/ethnic differences in treatment and mortality among women with triple-negative breast cancer. JAMA Oncology. May 13, 2021.

May 17, 2021 @ 10:12 am

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