Epidemic of HPV Associated Throat Cancer in Men

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Eric M Genden, MD, FACS Isidore Friesner Professor and Chairman Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Dr. Eric Genden

Eric M Genden, MD, FACS
Isidore Friesner Professor and Chairman
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this report? How has the clinical picture of HPV infections of oral and throat cancers changed over the past two decades?

Response: There has been no change however there has been a epidemic of viral induced throat cancer in men. The HPV virus has been established a the causative agent in cervical cancer in women. It has now been identified as a major causative agent in tonsillar and base of tongue cancer.

MedicalResearch.com: Are there different types of HPV? Do the commonly available HPV vaccines protect women/men from these cancers?

Response: There are over 100 viral types of HPV. The majority are associated with cutaneous warts. The remaining types are associated with non- malignant genital warts (Types 6 and 11), while Types 16 and 18 are associate with cervical cancer in women, anogenital cancers, and throat cancer.

Vaccination protects women against cervical cancer however there is no data to determine if the vaccine protects young men.

MedicalResearch.com: What type of treatment is available for HPV oral/throat cancer? How does robotic surgery improve the process or outcomes?

Response: HPV associated throat cancer can be treated with a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy or robotic surgery. Because many of the patients are relatively young, any therapy that can reduce toxicity and improve function and quality of life is a benefit. Robotic surgery has proven effective with outdenting cure rates and excellent functional outcomes. Robotic surgery obviates the need for radiotherapy in nearly a third of patients and provides an opportunity to reduce radiation doses in the remaining patients. This translates in to a better quality of life with less long term treatment effects.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation: 2016 AAO-HNS presentation:

HPV: What the Practicing Clinician Should Know

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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