US vs England: Where Do Lung Cancer Patients Live Longer?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

CT scan showing a cancerous tumor in the left lung Wikipedia image

CT scan showing a cancerous tumor in the left lung
Wikipedia image

Cary P. Gross, MD
Department of Internal Medicine
Section of General Internal Medicine
Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center
National Clinician Scholars Program
Yale School of Medicine New Haven, CT 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: In both the US and England, lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths, and there is particular concern about access to high quality care among older persons in both countries. However, little is known about how the two nations compare regarding lung cancer care.

We studied over 170,000 patients with lung cancer, and found that patients in the US were more likely to be diagnosed at an early stage (25% in US vs 15% of patients in England).  Our international team also found that patients in the US were more likely to receive treatment for their cancer, and were more likely to survive.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Response: There is plenty of opportunity for improvement in both health systems. It is reassuring that patients in the US were more likely to receive cancer treatment, and more likely to survive at least a year after diagnosis, yet future work should explore reasons for these differences and where there there are disparities within the different health systems based on race, gender, or social class.

Disclosures:  I have received research funding from Pfizer and 21st Century Oncology, as well as funding from Johnson & Johnson to assist with developing new approaches to sharing clinical trial data. 

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Anita Andreano et al, The Care and Outcomes of Older Persons with Lung Cancer in England and the United States, 2008-2012, Journal of Thoracic Oncology (2018). 
DOI: 10.1016/j.jtho.2018.04.022

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

 

 

 

 

 

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