History Of Testicular Cancer Linked To Increased Risk Of Prostate Cancer

M. Minhaj Siddiqui, MD Director of Urologic Robotic Surgery Assistant Professor of Surgery - Urology University of Maryland School of Medicine Baltimore MD 21201MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
M. Minhaj Siddiqui, MD
Director of Urologic Robotic Surgery
Assistant Professor of Surgery – Urology
University of Maryland School of Medicine
Baltimore MD 21201

Medical Research: What is the background for this study?

Response: A history of testicular cancer has been suggested to have an association with an increased risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) in epidemiologic studies. We hypothesized that there may be an increased risk of developing intermediate to high-risk prostate cancer as well.

Medical Research: What are the main findings?

Response: 147,044 men with melanoma and 32,435 men with testicular cancer were identified. Prostate cancer was diagnosed in 3,205 men in total. The cumulative incidence of all prostate cancer by age 80 was 2.8% in the control melanoma cohort and 12.6% in the case cohort of men with history of testicular cancer (p<0.0001 for KM survival curves, Figure 1). For intermediate/high-risk disease, the incidence was 1.1% versus 5.8% for each cohort respectively (p<0.0001 for KM survival curves, Figure 2). No association with prostate cancer was seen with non-seminomatous versus seminomatous germ cell tumors. Upon multivariate analysis, testis cancer was associated with an increased risk of all prostate cancer (HR 4.7, p<0.0001) and intermediate/high-risk PCa (HR 5.2, p<0.0001) when controlling for race and radiation history.

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Response: A history of testicular cancer is associated with a significantly increased risk of developing both prostate cancer and intermediate/high risk prostate cancer.  Men with a history of testicular cancer should consider discussing the potential harms and benefits of screening for prostate cancer.

Medical Research: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Future studies validating these results in different cohorts would strengthen the suspicion that this is a finding of significant concern

Citation:

2015 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium presentation discussing:

 Press Release:

Men who have had testicular cancer are more likely to develop prostate cancer, although overall risk of developing aggressive disease is low

 

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: M. Minhaj Siddiqui, MD (2015). History Of Testicular Cancer Linked To Increased Risk Of Prostate Cancer