Prophylactic Anticoagulation for Venous Thrombosis In Critically Ill Patients

Craig M. Lilly, M.D. Professor of Medicine Departments of Medicine, Anesthesiology, and Surgery, University of Massachusetts Medical School, and Clinical and Population Health Research Program, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Worcester, MAMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Craig M. Lilly, M.D.
Professor of Medicine
Departments of Medicine, Anesthesiology, and Surgery, University of Massachusetts Medical School, and Clinical and Population Health Research Program,
Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Worcester, MA

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Lilly: Critically ill adults with clinicians that chose to manage them with prophylactic anticoagulation were more likely to survive their hospitalization than patients that received venous thrombosis prophylaxis with mechanical devices or were not treated with venous thrombosis prophylaxis.
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Diagnosing Pulmonary Embolism: Using Age-Adjusted D-Dimer Cutoff Levels

Marc Righini, MD Division of Angiology and Hemostasis Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, SwitzerlandMedical Research.com Interview with:
Marc Righini, MD
Division of Angiology and Hemostasis
Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland

 

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of this study?

Dr. Righini: The study shows that when compared with a fixed D-Dimer cutoff of 500 ng/ml, the combination of pretest clinical probability assessment with age-adjusted D-dimer cut-off was associated  with a larger number of patients in whom Pulmonary Embolism  could be excluded, with a low likelihood of recurrent VTE. The benefit was the most important in patients  75 years or older, in whom using the age-adjusted cutoff instead of the 500 ng/ml cutoff increased five-fold the proportion of patients in whom PE could be excluded on the basis of D-dimer measurement.
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Pregnancy-Related Hospitalizations – Venous Thromboembolism Rates

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Sheree Boulet, DrPH, MPH
Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance and Research Team
Women’s Health and Fertility Branch
Division of Reproductive Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Boulet: Between 1994-2009, the rate of pregnancy-related hospitalizations with venous thromboembolism (VTE) increased by 14%. We also found that the prevalence of hypertension, obesity, diabetes, and heart disease increased over the same time period for pregnancy hospitalizations with VTE.
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