Losing Some Weight May Reduce Risk of Endometrial Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Juhua Luo, PhD Associate professor of epidemiology and biostatistics Indiana University School of Public Health

Dr. Juhua Luo

Juhua Luo, PhD
Associate professor of epidemiology and biostatistics
Indiana University School of Public Health

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: We already know obesity increases risk of endometrial cancer. However, information on whether weight loss reduces risk of endometrial cancer is limited.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: Women losing 5% or more weight reduced risk of getting endometrial cancer by 29%. This was observed for any weight loss but risk was even lower for obese women with intentional weight loss. Obese women intentionally losing their weights by 5% or more reduced risk of getting endometrial cancer by 56%.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Among post-menopausal women, intentional weight loss reduces risk of getting endometrial cancer, especially for obese women. Our findings suggest that weight loss in postmenopausal women may not be too late for potential health benefit.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Additional research on intentional weight loss in relation to risk for other obesity-related cancer types and for mortality from cancer or other diseases are needed.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Intentional Weight Loss and Endometrial Cancer Risk

Juhua LuoRowan T. ChlebowskiMichael HendryxThomas RohanJean Wactawski-WendeJ, Cynthia A. ThomsonAshley S. FelixChu Chen, …

JCO Jan 2017

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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Cancer Susceptibility Gene Mutations in Individuals With Colorectal Cancer

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Matthew B Yurgelun, M.D

Instructor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School
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Response: It has long been known that hereditary factors play a key role in colorectal cancer risk. It is currently well-established that approximately 3% of all colorectal cancers arise in the setting of Lynch syndrome, a relatively common inherited syndrome that markedly increases one’s lifetime risk of colorectal cancer, as well as cancers of the uterus, ovaries, stomach, small intestine, urinary tract, pancreas, and other malignancies. Current standard-of-care in the field is to test all colorectal cancer specimens for mismatch repair deficiency, which is a very reliable means of screening for Lynch syndrome. The prevalence of other hereditary syndromes among patients with colorectal cancer has not been known, though other such factors have been presumed to be quite rare.

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Specialized Surveillance Clinic For Patients At High Risk of Melanoma Reduced Procedures and Costs

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Caroline Watts| Research Fellow

Dr. Caroline Watts

Caroline Watts| Research Fellow
Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention Research
Sydney School of Public Health
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Depression Common in Lung Cancer and Linked To Mortality

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Donald R. Sullivan, M.D., M.A. Assistant Professor, Division of Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine Oregon Health & Science University Investigator, VA Portland Health Care System

Dr. Donald Sullivan

Donald R. Sullivan, M.D., M.A.
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No Link Found Between Vasectomy and Developing or Dying From Prostate Cancer

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Eric Jacobs, PHD | Strategic Director, Pharmacoepidemiology American Cancer Society, Inc. 250 Williams St. Atlanta, GA 30303

Dr. Eric Jacobs

Eric Jacobs, PHD
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250 Williams St.
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Genetic Determinants of Cisplatin Resistance in Patients With Advanced Germ Cell Tumors

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Darren R. Feldman, MD Medical Oncologist Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Dr. Darren Feldman

Darren R. Feldman, MD
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High SPF Sunscreen Use Linked To Lower Risk of Melanoma

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Reza Ghiasvand, PhD Postdoctoral fellow, Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo. Oslo, Norway

Dr. Reza Ghiasvand

Reza Ghiasvand, PhD
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Department of Biostatistics,
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University of Oslo.
Oslo, Norway

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: To date, findings from studies have been inconsistent. Some studies found a decreased risk of melanoma among sunscreen users, while others found no association or a higher risk of melanoma among sunscreen users. Several studies found that many sunscreen users do not apply sunscreens properly and do not reapply as recommended and stay longer in the sun after using sunscreen and as a result get sunburn and increase their risk of skin cancer.

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One Size Fits All Strategy No Longer Works For Treatment of Ovarian Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Larissa A. Meyer, MD MPH F.A.C.O.G. Assistant Professor Dept of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine Houston, TX 77030-1362

Dr. Larissa Meyer

Larissa A. Meyer, MD MPH F.A.C.O.G.
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Molecular Subtyping of Rectal Cancers Can Guide Prognosis, Treatment and Future Screening

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Y. Nancy You, MD, MHSc Associate Professor Section of Colorectal Surgery Department of Surgical Oncology Medical Director Familial High-risk Gastrointestinal Cancer Clinic University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Y. Nancy You

Y. Nancy You, MD, MHSc
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Older Breast Cancer Patients Much Less Likely to Receive 21-Gene Recurrence Score Testing

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Valentina Petkov, MD, MPH Health Scientist/Program Officer NIH/NCI/DCCPS/Surveillance Research Program

Dr. Petkov

Valentina Petkov, MD, MPH
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Primary Care Screening Detects Melanoma at Earlier Stage

Laura Ferris, M.D., Ph.D. Associate professor, Department of Dermatology University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Member of the Melanoma Program University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute

Dr. Laura Ferris

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Laura Ferris, M.D., Ph.D.
Associate professor, Department of Dermatology
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and
Member of the Melanoma Program
University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute

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Dr. Ferris: Rates of melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer, are on the rise, and skin cancer screenings are one of the most important steps for early detection and treatment. Typically, patients receive skin checks by setting up an appointment with a dermatologist. UPMC instituted a new screening initiative, which was modeled after a promising German program, the goal being to improve the detection of melanomas by making it easier for patients to get screened during routine office visits with their primary care physicians (PCPs). PCPs completed training on how to recognize melanomas and were asked to offer annual screening during office visits to all patients aged 35 and older. In 2014, during the first year of the program, 15 percent of the 333,788 eligible UPMC patients were screened in this fashion.

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