Artificial Sugar Aspartamine Linked to Worse Glucose Metabolism

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jennifer L. Kuk, PhD Associate Professor York University School of Kinesiology and Health Science Toronto, Ontario

Dr. Jennifer Kuk

Jennifer L. Kuk, PhD
Associate Professor
York University
School of Kinesiology and Health Science
Toronto, Ontario

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Kuk: Artificial sweeteners are used to help individuals manage their weight, however, individuals who consume aspartame (a type of artificial sweeteners) have worse glucose metabolism than individuals with the same body weight but do not consume aspartame. This observation was only true for adults with obesity. Further, saccharin and natural sugars were not associated with differences in health after considering differences in obesity.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Dr. Kuk: Obesity has clear negative health effects that should not be minimized. In this study, only one type of artificial sweetener was associated with worse health in individuals with obesity, who are also the most likely to consume artificial sweeteners. Currently, there are several newer artificial sweeteners that were not examined in this study. Thus, individuals need to weigh the benefits of artificial sweeteners for weight management versus any potentially negative health effects.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Kuk: Longitudinal intervention research is needed in populations with obesity to determine whether the weight management benefits outweigh any potential negative health consequences of using artificial sweeteners.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Jennifer L. Kuk, Ruth E. Brown. Aspartame intake is associated with greater glucose intolerance in individuals with obesity. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, 2016; 1 DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2015-0675

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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