Diabetes: Association with Depression and Eating Disorders

Dr Peter de Jonge Interdisciplinary Center for Psychopathology and Emotion Regulation, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, NetherlandsMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr Peter de Jonge
Interdisciplinary Center for Psychopathology and Emotion Regulation, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Netherlands


MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. de Jonge: The main findings were that depression and impulse control disorders, in particular binge eating and bulimia were associated with diabetes.

MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected?

Dr. de Jonge:  Yes, there is quite a literature on the association between depression and diabetes, but far less on impulse control disorders and diabetes.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. de Jonge: There might be a lifelong pathway in which persons first develop impulse control disorders and depression which may gradually develop into diabetes. The role of diet may be significant in this pathway.

MedicalResearch.com:  What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. de Jonge:  Future research should point out whether these associations are truly prospective, and if by early treatment of depression and impulse control disorders, diabetes might be prevented.

Citation:

Diabetologia. 2014 Feb 2. [Epub ahead of print]

Associations between DSM-IV mental disorders and diabetes mellitus: a role for impulse control disorders and depression.

de Jonge P, Alonso J, Stein DJ, Kiejna A, Aguilar-Gaxiola S, Viana MC, Liu Z, O’Neill S, Bruffaerts R, Caldas-de-Almeida JM, Lepine JP, Matschinger H, Levinson D, de Girolamo G, Fukao A, Bunting B, Haro JM, Posada-Villa JA, Al-Hamzawi AO, Medina-Mora ME, Piazza M, Hu C, Sasu C, Lim CC, Kessler RC, Scott KM.