Non-White Diabetics Have Higher Incidence of Early Kidney Disease

Satyesh K Sinha, PhD Assistant Professor Charles R Drew University of Medicine and Science Los Angeles, CA-90059MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Satyesh K Sinha, PhD
Assistant Professor
Charles R Drew University of Medicine and Science
Los Angeles, CA-90059


Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Sinha: Our main finding is that compared to Whites, African Americans (AAs) and Hispanics, with diabetes, have a higher prevalence of early chronic kidney disease (CKD) which is significantly associated with urinary albumin excretion (UAE) and/or C-reactive protein (CRP).

Medical Research: Were any of the findings unexpected?

Dr. Sinha: It is not completely unexpected but findings are new and very important.

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Sinha: The findings in this study provide additional evidence that inflammation plays an important role in the increased prevalence of early diabetic CKD in both ethnic groups, AAs and Hispanics. The association between UAE and CRP in AAs and Hispanics may impact CKD progression accounting in part for the exceptionally high rates of diabetes related end stage renal disease in minorities.

Medical Research: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Sinha: We are planning for prospective studies to assess whether a targeted intervention to reduce the level of inflammation is an effective strategy to prevent or slow the progression of CKD in diabetes, and whether there is particular efficacy of select interventions across racial/ethnic groups.

Citation:

Sinha SK1, Shaheen M, Rajavashisth TB, Pan D, Norris KC, Nicholas SB.
Association of race/ethnicity, inflammation, and albuminuria in patients with diabetes and early chronic kidney disease.

Diabetes Care. 2014 Apr;37(4):1060-8. doi: 10.2337/dc13-0013. Epub 2014 Feb 18