Regular Use of Artificial Sweeteners May Worsen Blood Glucose Control

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Richard L. Young PhD Associate Professor Adelaide Medical School The University of Adelaide Group Leader, Intestinal Nutrient Sensing Group Centre for Nutrition & Gastrointestinal Diseases South Australian Health & Medical Research Institute North Terrace, Adelaide | SA 

Dr. Young

Dr. Richard L. Young PhD
Associate Professor Adelaide Medical School
The University of Adelaide
Group Leader, Intestinal Nutrient Sensing Group
Centre for Nutrition & Gastrointestinal Diseases
South Australian Health & Medical Research Institute
North Terrace, Adelaide | SA

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: This study was a clinical trial in healthy subjects dosed a sweetener combination (sucralose and acesulfame-K) at a  dose to equal 1.5 L of artificial sweetened drink per day. This was given in capsules to dissolve in the proximal intestine (3 capsules per day, 2 weeks) and was a randomised, placebo-controlled double-blind study.

Sweetener treatment increased glucose absorption (assessed by serum 3-O-methy glucose), increased glycemic responses to duodenal glucose infusion and decreased GLP-1 responses.

These data show that intake of these sweeteners in healthy subjects may increase glycemic responses, and are the first to document an effect of these sweeteners to increase glucose absorption in humans.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Response: This study shows that regular high intake of artificial sweeteners may worsen control of blood glucose in healthy people. More studies are needed to ascertain the mechanisms involved, but it is likely that the augmented glucose uptake we have shown would add burden to the disposal of glucose in the body.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: We need to know more about the mechanisms, but this also a strong precedent to look at effects of sweeteners in people who have type 2 diabetes.

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Citation:

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions. 

This interview iis based on  EASD 2017 abstract 193 Impact of artificial sweeteners on glycaemic control in healthy humans presented at this year’s European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Lisbon, Portugal. 

 

 

 

 

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