Jean Wactawski-Wende PhD Dean, SUNY Distinguished Professor Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health School of Public Health and Health Professions University of Buffalo

Exercise Linked to Reduced Hip Fractures in Post-Menopausal Women

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jean Wactawski-Wende PhD Dean, SUNY Distinguished Professor Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health School of Public Health and Health Professions University of Buffalo

Dr. Wactawski-Wende

Jean Wactawski-Wende PhD
Dean, SUNY Distinguished Professor
Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health
School of Public Health and Health Professions
University of Buffalo

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: This study included data from the Women’s Health Initiative, a prospective study of postmenopausal women from across the United States. We assessed physical activity in 77,206 women over an average of 14 years of follow-up. Approximately 1/3 of these women (average age 63.4 years) had at least one fracture occur.

Higher physical activity levels were associated with  lower risk of hip and total fracture. Even levels of activity that were moderate, including regular walking and doing household chores, were beneficial. 

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Physical activity in older women is important for prevention of heart disease, certain cancers and early mortality. The WHI study has showed that regular activity including regular walking provided benefit in prevention of total and hip fracture.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: Additional studies to assess the many benefits of regular activity on health are important. This study was one of the first to assess moderate forms of activity on fracture in older women. Looking at sedentary behavior itself (women reporting spending 9.5 hours per day on average sitting or lying down, increased their risk for total fracture. Therefore in addition to increasing physical activity, just getting up more often was important. 

Any disclosures?

No disclosures. This study was funded by the NHLBI/NIH. 

Citation:

LaMonte MJ, Wactawski-Wende J, Larson JC, et al. Association of Physical Activity and Fracture Risk Among Postmenopausal Women. JAMA Netw Open. Published online October 25, 20192(10):e1914084. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.14084

 

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Oct 28, 2019 @ 2:43 pm

 

 

 

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