HDL Function: Improved with Strength Training, Even in Overweight

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Christian K. Roberts
Exercise and Metabolic Disease Research Laboratory,
Translational Sciences Section, School of Nursing
University of California, Los Angeles, CA

MedicalResearch.com: How would you best summarize the main findings/results of this study?

Answer: Our main finding was that HDL functioned better in its antioxidant role in subjects who participated in resistance exercise training (i.e. weight training) a minimum of 4 days a week, regardless of their weight—one group was lean (BMI <25) and the other overweight/obese (BMI >27) —than those who didn’t exercise (overweight, BMI >27, and untrained). In addition, HDL had similar effectiveness as an antioxidant in the overweight-trained group as in the as lean-trained group. Although indices of weight were associated with dysfunctional HDL, differences in fitness may be a better measure of who has healthier functioning HDL.

MedicalResearch.com: How would you best summarize the main findings/results of this study? What are the benefits of these findings?

Answer These findings suggest that regular strength training might improve HDL function and this may contribute to the beneficial effects of strength training on reducing cardiovascular disease risk, even in those who remain overweight.

MedicalResearch.com: How would you best summarize the main findings/results of this study? Were any of the findings unexpected?

Answer No, based on some of our recent studies, improvements in markers of metabolic and cardiovascular health appear to be improved with lifestyle modification, even in those overweight or obese.

MedicalResearch.com: How would you best summarize the main findings/results of this study? What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Answer: Clinicians and patients should be aware that the quantity isn’t the only thing to consider when focusing on HDL.  Its qualitative properties as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory are important to consider.

MedicalResearch.com: How would you best summarize the main findings/results of this study? What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Answer: Future research might consider estimating HDL’s functional properties and further investigate the roles of strength fitness and body weight in the context of HDL’s anti-atherosclerotic properties and other related indices of cardiovascular and metabolic health.

Citation:

Untrained Young Men Have Dysfunctional HDL Compared to Strength Trained Men Irrespective of Overweight/Obesity Status

Christian K Roberts, Michael Katiraie, Daniel M Croymans, Otto O. Yang, and Theodoros Kelesidis

J Appl Physiol jap.00359.2013; published ahead of print July 25, 2013, doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00359.2013