Exercise At Any Age Can Improve Bone Health

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Pamela S. Hinton, Ph.D. Associate Professor Director of Graduate Studies, Nutritional Sciences Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology University of Missouri, Columbia MO 65211

Dr. Pam Hinton

Pamela S. Hinton, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Director of Graduate Studies, Nutritional Sciences
Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology
University of Missouri, Columbia MO 65211

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Hinton: Because bone mass declines with age, maximization of peak bone mass is recommended as the most effective way to prevent osteoporosis. Acquisition of at least 90% of peak bone mass occurs by the age of 18 years, with additional gains of 5% to 10% during young adulthood. Because mechanical loading induces a greater adaptive response in young, compared with old, bone, adolescence and young adulthood constitute a unique window of opportunity to increase bone mass via physical activity. Although physical activity during adolescence and young adulthood is a key determinant of peak bone mass and, therefore, of future bone health, exercise after skeletal maturation can also reduce the risk of osteoporosis and related fractures.
Therefore, the objective of the present study was threefold:

(a) to examine the relationships between current BMD of the whole body, hip, and lumbar spine and physical activity–associated bone loading during adolescence (13-18 years), young adulthood (19-29 years), and current physical activity–associated bone loading;
(b) to investigate the effects of current participation in a high-impact physical activity and/or resistance training on BMD of the whole body, total hip, and lumbar spine in apparently healthy, physically active men; and,
(c) to evaluate the effects of continuous participation in high-impact activity throughout the life span on BMD of the whole body, total hip, and lumbar spine.

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Hinton: Bone loading during adolescence and young adulthood were significant, positive predictors of BMD of the whole body, total hip, and lumbar spine, adjusting for lean body mass and/or age in the regression models. Individuals who currently participate in a high-impact activity had greater lumbar spine BMD than nonparticipants. Men who continuously participated in a high-impact activity had greater hip and lumbar spine BMD than those who did not.

In conclusion, physical activity–associated bone loading both during and after skeletal growth is positively associated with adult bone mass.

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Hinton: It is never too late to start an exercise program that is targeted to bone.  A few minutes of a high-impact activity or resistance training several times per week can help maintain or even increase bone mass in men.

Medical Research: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Hinton: With increasing availability of new imaging techniques, it is possible to estimate bone strength at some skeletal sites. It would be useful to examine the relationship between exercise-associated bone loading during skeletal growth on estimates of bone strength during middle-age.

Citation:


A. Strope, P. Nigh, M. I. Carter, N. Lin, J. Jiang, P. S. Hinton. Physical Activity-Associated Bone Loading During Adolescence and Young Adulthood Is Positively Associated With Adult Bone Mineral Density in Men.American Journal of Men’s Health, 2014; 9 (6): 442 DOI:10.1177/1557988314549749


Exercise At Any Age Can Improve Bone Health (2016). Never Too Late To Start An Exercise Program Targeted To Bone Health MedicalResearch.com

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