Childhood Sleep Apnea : A Randomized Trial of Adenotonsillectomy

Dr. Susan Redline M.D.,M.P.H. Peter C. Farrell Professor of Sleep Medicine at Harvard Medical School Brigham and Women's Hospital 221 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA 02115MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Susan Redline M.D.,M.P.H.
Peter C. Farrell Professor of Sleep Medicine at Harvard Medical School
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
221 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA 02115

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Redline: Among children with sleep apnea, early adenotonsillectomy resulted in significant improvements in breathing during sleep, daytime behavior, sleep related symptoms, sleepiness and quality of life when we valuated 6 months after surgery.

MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected?

Dr. Redline: Almost half of children had resolution of their sleep apnea after a 6 month period, without surgery. Although the group who received early tonsillectomy had improved behavior, their cognitive skills did not improve more as compared to children who received supportive care only.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Redline: Early tonsillectomy may be useful in improving the sleep quality, daytime functioning and behavior of children with sleep apnea.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Redline: There is a need to understand the role of surgery in children who snore but do not have sleep apnea on their sleep study, and understand if they too may benefit more from early surgery compared to supportive care.

Citation:

A Randomized Trial of Adenotonsillectomy for Childhood Sleep Apnea.

Marcus CL, Moore RH, Rosen CL, Giordani B, Garetz SL, Taylor HG, Mitchell RB, Amin R, Katz ES, Arens R, Paruthi S, Muzumdar H, Gozal D, Thomas NH, Ware J, Beebe D, Snyder K, Elden L, Sprecher RC, Willging P, Jones D, Bent JP, Hoban T, Chervin RD, Ellenberg SS, Redline S; the ChildhoodAdenotonsillectomyTrial (CHAT).

N Engl J Med. 2013 May 21. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 23692173 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]