Significant Sex Differences in Genetic Associations with Longevity

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Yi Zeng, Ph.D.| Professor, Center for Study of Aging and Human Development and Geriatrics Division, School of Medicine, Duke University Professor, National School of Development, Chief Scientist of Raissun Institute for Advanced Studies, Peking University Distinguished Research Scholar, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research Foreign member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences

Dr. Yi Zeng

Yi Zeng, Ph.D.|
Professor, Center for Study of Aging and Human Development and Geriatrics Division, School of Medicine, Duke University
Professor, National School of Development, Chief Scientist of Raissun Institute for Advanced Studies, Peking University
Distinguished Research Scholar, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Foreign member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Science

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Sex differences in genetic associations with human longevity remain largely unknown; investigations on this topic are important for individualized healthcare.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Our sex-specific genome-wide association study (GWAS) and sex-specific polygenic risk score analyses on longevity reported in this JAMA Network Open article found substantial and significant differences in genetic associations with longevity between males and females.

We also found that all previously published GWAS on longevity identified some sex-independent genetic variants, but missed sex-specific longevity loci and pathways. 

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work? 

Response: The sex differences in genetic associations with longevity are remarkable, but have been overlooked by previously published GWAS on longevity. The present study made significant contributions to filling this research gap. 

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add? 

Response: This study provides a scientific basis for further investigating effects of sex-specific genetic variants and their interactions with environment on healthy aging, which may substantially contribute to more effective and targeted individualized healthcare for male and female elderly.

Citation:

Zeng Y, Nie C, Min J, et al. Sex Differences in Genetic Associations With Longevity. JAMA Network Open.2018;1(4):e181670. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2018.1670

Aug 27, 2018 @ 3:48 pm 

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