West-African Genetic Ancestry Associated with Protection Against Obesity in Men

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Yann C. Klimentidis PhD Assistant Professor Epidemiology and Biostatistics Department The University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85724

Dr. Yann Klimentidis

Dr. Yann C. Klimentidis PhD
Assistant Professor
Epidemiology and Biostatistics Department
The University of Arizona
Tucson, AZ 85724

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Klimentidis: There is a large gender disparity in obesity rates among African-Americans. African-American women have much higher rates of overweight and obesity as compared to African-American men. We hypothesized that genetic factors may partly explain this difference. So we tested whether the influence of West-African genetic ancestry on obesity differed among men and women. We found that greater West-African genetic ancestry was associated with protection against central obesity in men, but no such effect was observed in women.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Dr. Klimentidis: Population differences in disease risk can originate from both genetic and non-genetic factors. Disentangling these influences can be difficult, but doing so is important in order to determine how to effectively address health disparities.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Klimentidis: More research is needed to examine in greater detail the extent to which socio-economic and cultural factors account for this large gender disparity. At the same time, it will be important to identify the specific genes that may play a role in the disparity.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Yann C. Klimentidis et al. The genetic contribution of West-African ancestry to protection against central obesity in African-American men but not women: results from the ARIC and MESA studies. Frontiers in Genetics, May 2016 DOI: 10.3389/fgene.2016.00089

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

More Medical Research Interviews on MedicalResearch.com.

No Comments

Post A Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.