Megan Francis-Sedlak, PhD Associate Director of Medical Affairs Horizon Therapeutics Lake Forest, Illinois

Renal Transplant Complications in Patients with and without Gout

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Megan Francis-Sedlak, PhD Associate Director of Medical Affairs Horizon Therapeutics Lake Forest, Illinois

Dr. Francis-Sedlak

Megan Francis-Sedlak, PhD
Director of Medical Affairs
Horizon Therapeutics
Lake Forest, Illinois

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: The prevalence of gout is more than ten-fold greater among patients who have undergone a kidney transplant than the general population as post-transplant medications to prevent organ rejection can contribute to increased uric acid levels. Overall studies have shown this can lead to higher rates of uncontrolled gout among this vulnerable population with organ transplants.

While we have seen higher mortality rates for patients who have received a kidney transplant with uncontrolled gout compared to kidney transplant patients without uncontrolled gout, we wanted to evaluate the impact of gout on transplant-related complications to better inform patient care and treatment approaches.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: Using a large U.S. population database, we determined that patients with gout, especially those with gout arising post-transplant, suffered from higher rates of overall transplant-related complications.

Specifically, the analysis revealed that the renal transplant complication rate in the overall cohort was 36%. Patients with gout had a higher renal transplant complication rate, which was approximately 40.4%, while those without gout had a complication rate of 34.6%. Further, we found that the higher complication rate in gout patients is driven by those patients who developed gout after they received a transplant.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: The analysis indicates that kidney transplant patients with gout, especially those with gout arising post-transplant, are at a greater risk of transplant-related complications. This data should help physicians better make the connection in high risk patients to screen for, address, and improve gout outcomes among kidney disease patients, particularly those who have received a transplant.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: The science continues to emerge on the additive nature of gout and elevated uric acid levels and their impact on the kidneys and renal function. We are just beginning to understand the systemic implications of elevated uric acid levels and urate crystal deposition in the body, including the full extent of renal effects.

Disclosures: I am a director of medical affairs at Horizon Therapeutics plc. I earned my Bachelor of Science in biomedical engineering from Saint Louis University as well as a Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from Illinois Institute of Technology.

Citation: ASN abstract November 2019

Francis-Sedlak M, LaMoreaux B, Holt RJ. Renal transplant complications in patients with and without gout. Presented at the American Society of Nephrology’s Kidney Week 2019 meeting held November 5-10 in Washington DC. Abstract FR-PO1170.

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Last Modified: Nov 10, 2019 @ 6:07 pm

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